C-Level Decision-Makers: 5 Ways to Reach Them.

100992526_CEO-Type-500pxIn the world of B2B, the holy grail is the  “C-level”  or C-suite.

If you’re marketing to chiefs or C-level executives — CEOs, CIOs, COOs, CFOs, CMOs, etc. — you’ve probably have noticed some significant changes in recent years. Some of those changes make it more difficult to contact these important C-level decision-makers. Some actually make it easier.  Here are five ways the C-suite landscape has changed…and how marketers can leverage them for the greatest impact.

1) The customer decision journey is changing. According to Jonathan Gordan at McKinsey Partners, the notion of “moments of truth” is more important than ever. And many of those moments of truth are related to service delivery and brand experience. Which means the onus goes well beyond marketing communications. C-level prospects are familiar with your brand. If they haven’t experienced it themselves, they can quickly gather information about you online.

What you can do: Ensure that your service delivery and brand experience match your marketing messages. If there’s been a known issue, be prepared to address it when you meet with C-level players. Research your brand online and in social media. And research your competition. You might find an opportunity.

2) C-level executives are part of the “always-on” work ethic. Ever wonder at how our nation’s leaders maintain seemingly non-stop schedules of meetings, travel and public appearances? Successful pop stars, actors, consultants and other top performers are the same way. While many c-level decision-makers maintain a healthy work-life balance, they do not “turn it off” when going home. The thinking goes on round the clock. So if your marketing messages have sticking power, or can be reviewed easily at 1:30 a.m., you’re more likely to be considered.

What you can do: We’re not talking about midnight candygrams to the CEO’s house. But you might test emails that arrive after business hours, printed pieces that look more like magazines and have after-hours appeal, or mobile marketing someone can play with anytime.

3) C-suite executives are changing roles and positions faster. According to Forbes magazine, CMO tenure is now about 43 months, not even four years. Other c-levels may stay in their positions longer. But the fact is, top performers are ambitious and in high demand. So they move around a lot.

What you can do: It comes down to contact verification. If you’re spending money on high-level marketing programs, your first dollars should go toward confirming the names, titles and roles of the decision-makers you want to reach. This is your chance to look really smart with relevant, personalized communications. In fact, if you take the time to conduct in-depth interview calls with a portion of the audience, you’ll glean even more insights that can improve your messaging effectiveness.

4) More collaborative than ever. There are still plenty of highly charismatic leaders who drive entire companies through sheer force of will. (Most recently, Steve Jobs comes to mind). But more 122413525_two-execs-on-stairs-500pxoften, decision-making in a c-suite is done as a collective. Three or more brains are smarter than one. And when you have shareholders, board leadership, compliance officers and employee oversight to consider, it’s just a good idea to share the weight of directional decisions. The downside for marketers? You have to win over several leaders in any prospect organization.

What you can do: By encouraging and even facilitating conversations among the most logical decision-makers, you can position yourself as a collaborator who not only understands the value of a group decision, but how to get there. Messaging should be tailored to the interests of each stakeholder, but reflective of the ultimate goals of the organization.

5) Mobile, mobile, mobile. It’s easy to assume that c-suite leaders are the last to adopt new technology. And it’s true that their social media participation can be lower than their younger counterparts. But the smart phone and tablet explosion is in some ways being led by these fast-moving, high-powered executives. They love the empowering convenience of it. Their schedules and duties require it. They can afford to try the latest gadgets. And they’re smart, so learning new operating systems every 18 months is not a barrier.

What you can do: Think mobile first. If you’re designing a website, be sure that responsive design is built into the specs. If you’re creating emails, optimize for mobile viewing. Apps are a great idea, as long as they offer real user value and do not require too much commitment. Digital white papers and e-books make great airplane reading on a tablet. There are many new mobile advertising opportunities to consider. And the possibilities with augmented reality at a trade show or exclusive event are seeming endless. So if you’re looking to reach c-levels, remember that their mobile devices may be the most direct route.

Bottom Line on Top Executives

Something that hasn’t changed but is very important to remember: C-level contacts in b2b marketing campaigns are people just like you and me. They have families. They have hobbies. Sure, they have the heavy responsibilities of steering massive organizations. But their decision-making calculus is still human and often emotional. Never forget you’re talking to a person.

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There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

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C-Level Decision-Makers: 5 Ways to Reach Them.

100992526_CEO-Type-500pxIn the world of B2B, the holy grail is the  “C-level”  or C-suite.

If you’re marketing to chiefs or C-level executives — CEOs, CIOs, COOs, CFOs, CMOs, etc. — you’ve probably have noticed some significant changes in recent years. Some of those changes make it more difficult to contact these important C-level decision-makers. Some actually make it easier.  Here are five ways the C-suite landscape has changed…and how marketers can leverage them for the greatest impact.

1) The customer decision journey is changing. According to Jonathan Gordan at McKinsey Partners, the notion of “moments of truth” is more important than ever. And many of those moments of truth are related to service delivery and brand experience. Which means the onus goes well beyond marketing communications. C-level prospects are familiar with your brand. If they haven’t experienced it themselves, they can quickly gather information about you online.

What you can do: Ensure that your service delivery and brand experience match your marketing messages. If there’s been a known issue, be prepared to address it when you meet with C-level players. Research your brand online and in social media. And research your competition. You might find an opportunity.

2) C-level executives are part of the “always-on” work ethic. Ever wonder at how our nation’s leaders maintain seemingly non-stop schedules of meetings, travel and public appearances? Successful pop stars, actors, consultants and other top performers are the same way. While many c-level decision-makers maintain a healthy work-life balance, they do not “turn it off” when going home. The thinking goes on round the clock. So if your marketing messages have sticking power, or can be reviewed easily at 1:30 a.m., you’re more likely to be considered.

What you can do: We’re not talking about midnight candygrams to the CEO’s house. But you might test emails that arrive after business hours, printed pieces that look more like magazines and have after-hours appeal, or mobile marketing someone can play with anytime.

3) C-suite executives are changing roles and positions faster. According to Forbes magazine, CMO tenure is now about 43 months, not even four years. Other c-levels may stay in their positions longer. But the fact is, top performers are ambitious and in high demand. So they move around a lot.

What you can do: It comes down to contact verification. If you’re spending money on high-level marketing programs, your first dollars should go toward confirming the names, titles and roles of the decision-makers you want to reach. This is your chance to look really smart with relevant, personalized communications. In fact, if you take the time to conduct in-depth interview calls with a portion of the audience, you’ll glean even more insights that can improve your messaging effectiveness.

4) More collaborative than ever. There are still plenty of highly charismatic leaders who drive entire companies through sheer force of will. (Most recently, Steve Jobs comes to mind). But more 122413525_two-execs-on-stairs-500pxoften, decision-making in a c-suite is done as a collective. Three or more brains are smarter than one. And when you have shareholders, board leadership, compliance officers and employee oversight to consider, it’s just a good idea to share the weight of directional decisions. The downside for marketers? You have to win over several leaders in any prospect organization.

What you can do: By encouraging and even facilitating conversations among the most logical decision-makers, you can position yourself as a collaborator who not only understands the value of a group decision, but how to get there. Messaging should be tailored to the interests of each stakeholder, but reflective of the ultimate goals of the organization.

5) Mobile, mobile, mobile. It’s easy to assume that c-suite leaders are the last to adopt new technology. And it’s true that their social media participation can be lower than their younger counterparts. But the smart phone and tablet explosion is in some ways being led by these fast-moving, high-powered executives. They love the empowering convenience of it. Their schedules and duties require it. They can afford to try the latest gadgets. And they’re smart, so learning new operating systems every 18 months is not a barrier.

What you can do: Think mobile first. If you’re designing a website, be sure that responsive design is built into the specs. If you’re creating emails, optimize for mobile viewing. Apps are a great idea, as long as they offer real user value and do not require too much commitment. Digital white papers and e-books make great airplane reading on a tablet. There are many new mobile advertising opportunities to consider. And the possibilities with augmented reality at a trade show or exclusive event are seeming endless. So if you’re looking to reach c-levels, remember that their mobile devices may be the most direct route.

Bottom Line on Top Executives

Something that hasn’t changed but is very important to remember: C-level contacts in b2b marketing campaigns are people just like you and me. They have families. They have hobbies. Sure, they have the heavy responsibilities of steering massive organizations. But their decision-making calculus is still human and often emotional. Never forget you’re talking to a person.

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How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

C-Level Decision-Makers: 5 Ways to Reach Them.

100992526_CEO-Type-500pxIn the world of B2B, the holy grail is the  “C-level”  or C-suite.

If you’re marketing to chiefs or C-level executives — CEOs, CIOs, COOs, CFOs, CMOs, etc. — you’ve probably have noticed some significant changes in recent years. Some of those changes make it more difficult to contact these important C-level decision-makers. Some actually make it easier.  Here are five ways the C-suite landscape has changed…and how marketers can leverage them for the greatest impact.

1) The customer decision journey is changing. According to Jonathan Gordan at McKinsey Partners, the notion of “moments of truth” is more important than ever. And many of those moments of truth are related to service delivery and brand experience. Which means the onus goes well beyond marketing communications. C-level prospects are familiar with your brand. If they haven’t experienced it themselves, they can quickly gather information about you online.

What you can do: Ensure that your service delivery and brand experience match your marketing messages. If there’s been a known issue, be prepared to address it when you meet with C-level players. Research your brand online and in social media. And research your competition. You might find an opportunity.

2) C-level executives are part of the “always-on” work ethic. Ever wonder at how our nation’s leaders maintain seemingly non-stop schedules of meetings, travel and public appearances? Successful pop stars, actors, consultants and other top performers are the same way. While many c-level decision-makers maintain a healthy work-life balance, they do not “turn it off” when going home. The thinking goes on round the clock. So if your marketing messages have sticking power, or can be reviewed easily at 1:30 a.m., you’re more likely to be considered.

What you can do: We’re not talking about midnight candygrams to the CEO’s house. But you might test emails that arrive after business hours, printed pieces that look more like magazines and have after-hours appeal, or mobile marketing someone can play with anytime.

3) C-suite executives are changing roles and positions faster. According to Forbes magazine, CMO tenure is now about 43 months, not even four years. Other c-levels may stay in their positions longer. But the fact is, top performers are ambitious and in high demand. So they move around a lot.

What you can do: It comes down to contact verification. If you’re spending money on high-level marketing programs, your first dollars should go toward confirming the names, titles and roles of the decision-makers you want to reach. This is your chance to look really smart with relevant, personalized communications. In fact, if you take the time to conduct in-depth interview calls with a portion of the audience, you’ll glean even more insights that can improve your messaging effectiveness.

4) More collaborative than ever. There are still plenty of highly charismatic leaders who drive entire companies through sheer force of will. (Most recently, Steve Jobs comes to mind). But more 122413525_two-execs-on-stairs-500pxoften, decision-making in a c-suite is done as a collective. Three or more brains are smarter than one. And when you have shareholders, board leadership, compliance officers and employee oversight to consider, it’s just a good idea to share the weight of directional decisions. The downside for marketers? You have to win over several leaders in any prospect organization.

What you can do: By encouraging and even facilitating conversations among the most logical decision-makers, you can position yourself as a collaborator who not only understands the value of a group decision, but how to get there. Messaging should be tailored to the interests of each stakeholder, but reflective of the ultimate goals of the organization.

5) Mobile, mobile, mobile. It’s easy to assume that c-suite leaders are the last to adopt new technology. And it’s true that their social media participation can be lower than their younger counterparts. But the smart phone and tablet explosion is in some ways being led by these fast-moving, high-powered executives. They love the empowering convenience of it. Their schedules and duties require it. They can afford to try the latest gadgets. And they’re smart, so learning new operating systems every 18 months is not a barrier.

What you can do: Think mobile first. If you’re designing a website, be sure that responsive design is built into the specs. If you’re creating emails, optimize for mobile viewing. Apps are a great idea, as long as they offer real user value and do not require too much commitment. Digital white papers and e-books make great airplane reading on a tablet. There are many new mobile advertising opportunities to consider. And the possibilities with augmented reality at a trade show or exclusive event are seeming endless. So if you’re looking to reach c-levels, remember that their mobile devices may be the most direct route.

Bottom Line on Top Executives

Something that hasn’t changed but is very important to remember: C-level contacts in b2b marketing campaigns are people just like you and me. They have families. They have hobbies. Sure, they have the heavy responsibilities of steering massive organizations. But their decision-making calculus is still human and often emotional. Never forget you’re talking to a person.

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How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

C-Level Decision-Makers: 5 Ways to Reach Them.

100992526_CEO-Type-500pxIn the world of B2B, the holy grail is the  “C-level”  or C-suite.

If you’re marketing to chiefs or C-level executives — CEOs, CIOs, COOs, CFOs, CMOs, etc. — you’ve probably have noticed some significant changes in recent years. Some of those changes make it more difficult to contact these important C-level decision-makers. Some actually make it easier.  Here are five ways the C-suite landscape has changed…and how marketers can leverage them for the greatest impact.

1) The customer decision journey is changing. According to Jonathan Gordan at McKinsey Partners, the notion of “moments of truth” is more important than ever. And many of those moments of truth are related to service delivery and brand experience. Which means the onus goes well beyond marketing communications. C-level prospects are familiar with your brand. If they haven’t experienced it themselves, they can quickly gather information about you online.

What you can do: Ensure that your service delivery and brand experience match your marketing messages. If there’s been a known issue, be prepared to address it when you meet with C-level players. Research your brand online and in social media. And research your competition. You might find an opportunity.

2) C-level executives are part of the “always-on” work ethic. Ever wonder at how our nation’s leaders maintain seemingly non-stop schedules of meetings, travel and public appearances? Successful pop stars, actors, consultants and other top performers are the same way. While many c-level decision-makers maintain a healthy work-life balance, they do not “turn it off” when going home. The thinking goes on round the clock. So if your marketing messages have sticking power, or can be reviewed easily at 1:30 a.m., you’re more likely to be considered.

What you can do: We’re not talking about midnight candygrams to the CEO’s house. But you might test emails that arrive after business hours, printed pieces that look more like magazines and have after-hours appeal, or mobile marketing someone can play with anytime.

3) C-suite executives are changing roles and positions faster. According to Forbes magazine, CMO tenure is now about 43 months, not even four years. Other c-levels may stay in their positions longer. But the fact is, top performers are ambitious and in high demand. So they move around a lot.

What you can do: It comes down to contact verification. If you’re spending money on high-level marketing programs, your first dollars should go toward confirming the names, titles and roles of the decision-makers you want to reach. This is your chance to look really smart with relevant, personalized communications. In fact, if you take the time to conduct in-depth interview calls with a portion of the audience, you’ll glean even more insights that can improve your messaging effectiveness.

4) More collaborative than ever. There are still plenty of highly charismatic leaders who drive entire companies through sheer force of will. (Most recently, Steve Jobs comes to mind). But more 122413525_two-execs-on-stairs-500pxoften, decision-making in a c-suite is done as a collective. Three or more brains are smarter than one. And when you have shareholders, board leadership, compliance officers and employee oversight to consider, it’s just a good idea to share the weight of directional decisions. The downside for marketers? You have to win over several leaders in any prospect organization.

What you can do: By encouraging and even facilitating conversations among the most logical decision-makers, you can position yourself as a collaborator who not only understands the value of a group decision, but how to get there. Messaging should be tailored to the interests of each stakeholder, but reflective of the ultimate goals of the organization.

5) Mobile, mobile, mobile. It’s easy to assume that c-suite leaders are the last to adopt new technology. And it’s true that their social media participation can be lower than their younger counterparts. But the smart phone and tablet explosion is in some ways being led by these fast-moving, high-powered executives. They love the empowering convenience of it. Their schedules and duties require it. They can afford to try the latest gadgets. And they’re smart, so learning new operating systems every 18 months is not a barrier.

What you can do: Think mobile first. If you’re designing a website, be sure that responsive design is built into the specs. If you’re creating emails, optimize for mobile viewing. Apps are a great idea, as long as they offer real user value and do not require too much commitment. Digital white papers and e-books make great airplane reading on a tablet. There are many new mobile advertising opportunities to consider. And the possibilities with augmented reality at a trade show or exclusive event are seeming endless. So if you’re looking to reach c-levels, remember that their mobile devices may be the most direct route.

Bottom Line on Top Executives

Something that hasn’t changed but is very important to remember: C-level contacts in b2b marketing campaigns are people just like you and me. They have families. They have hobbies. Sure, they have the heavy responsibilities of steering massive organizations. But their decision-making calculus is still human and often emotional. Never forget you’re talking to a person.

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How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

C-Level Decision-Makers: 5 Ways to Reach Them.

100992526_CEO-Type-500pxIn the world of B2B, the holy grail is the  “C-level”  or C-suite.

If you’re marketing to chiefs or C-level executives — CEOs, CIOs, COOs, CFOs, CMOs, etc. — you’ve probably have noticed some significant changes in recent years. Some of those changes make it more difficult to contact these important C-level decision-makers. Some actually make it easier.  Here are five ways the C-suite landscape has changed…and how marketers can leverage them for the greatest impact.

1) The customer decision journey is changing. According to Jonathan Gordan at McKinsey Partners, the notion of “moments of truth” is more important than ever. And many of those moments of truth are related to service delivery and brand experience. Which means the onus goes well beyond marketing communications. C-level prospects are familiar with your brand. If they haven’t experienced it themselves, they can quickly gather information about you online.

What you can do: Ensure that your service delivery and brand experience match your marketing messages. If there’s been a known issue, be prepared to address it when you meet with C-level players. Research your brand online and in social media. And research your competition. You might find an opportunity.

2) C-level executives are part of the “always-on” work ethic. Ever wonder at how our nation’s leaders maintain seemingly non-stop schedules of meetings, travel and public appearances? Successful pop stars, actors, consultants and other top performers are the same way. While many c-level decision-makers maintain a healthy work-life balance, they do not “turn it off” when going home. The thinking goes on round the clock. So if your marketing messages have sticking power, or can be reviewed easily at 1:30 a.m., you’re more likely to be considered.

What you can do: We’re not talking about midnight candygrams to the CEO’s house. But you might test emails that arrive after business hours, printed pieces that look more like magazines and have after-hours appeal, or mobile marketing someone can play with anytime.

3) C-suite executives are changing roles and positions faster. According to Forbes magazine, CMO tenure is now about 43 months, not even four years. Other c-levels may stay in their positions longer. But the fact is, top performers are ambitious and in high demand. So they move around a lot.

What you can do: It comes down to contact verification. If you’re spending money on high-level marketing programs, your first dollars should go toward confirming the names, titles and roles of the decision-makers you want to reach. This is your chance to look really smart with relevant, personalized communications. In fact, if you take the time to conduct in-depth interview calls with a portion of the audience, you’ll glean even more insights that can improve your messaging effectiveness.

4) More collaborative than ever. There are still plenty of highly charismatic leaders who drive entire companies through sheer force of will. (Most recently, Steve Jobs comes to mind). But more 122413525_two-execs-on-stairs-500pxoften, decision-making in a c-suite is done as a collective. Three or more brains are smarter than one. And when you have shareholders, board leadership, compliance officers and employee oversight to consider, it’s just a good idea to share the weight of directional decisions. The downside for marketers? You have to win over several leaders in any prospect organization.

What you can do: By encouraging and even facilitating conversations among the most logical decision-makers, you can position yourself as a collaborator who not only understands the value of a group decision, but how to get there. Messaging should be tailored to the interests of each stakeholder, but reflective of the ultimate goals of the organization.

5) Mobile, mobile, mobile. It’s easy to assume that c-suite leaders are the last to adopt new technology. And it’s true that their social media participation can be lower than their younger counterparts. But the smart phone and tablet explosion is in some ways being led by these fast-moving, high-powered executives. They love the empowering convenience of it. Their schedules and duties require it. They can afford to try the latest gadgets. And they’re smart, so learning new operating systems every 18 months is not a barrier.

What you can do: Think mobile first. If you’re designing a website, be sure that responsive design is built into the specs. If you’re creating emails, optimize for mobile viewing. Apps are a great idea, as long as they offer real user value and do not require too much commitment. Digital white papers and e-books make great airplane reading on a tablet. There are many new mobile advertising opportunities to consider. And the possibilities with augmented reality at a trade show or exclusive event are seeming endless. So if you’re looking to reach c-levels, remember that their mobile devices may be the most direct route.

Bottom Line on Top Executives

Something that hasn’t changed but is very important to remember: C-level contacts in b2b marketing campaigns are people just like you and me. They have families. They have hobbies. Sure, they have the heavy responsibilities of steering massive organizations. But their decision-making calculus is still human and often emotional. Never forget you’re talking to a person.

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Enhanced by Zemanta

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

C-Level Decision-Makers: 5 Ways to Reach Them.

100992526_CEO-Type-500pxIn the world of B2B, the holy grail is the  “C-level”  or C-suite.

If you’re marketing to chiefs or C-level executives — CEOs, CIOs, COOs, CFOs, CMOs, etc. — you’ve probably have noticed some significant changes in recent years. Some of those changes make it more difficult to contact these important C-level decision-makers. Some actually make it easier.  Here are five ways the C-suite landscape has changed…and how marketers can leverage them for the greatest impact.

1) The customer decision journey is changing. According to Jonathan Gordan at McKinsey Partners, the notion of “moments of truth” is more important than ever. And many of those moments of truth are related to service delivery and brand experience. Which means the onus goes well beyond marketing communications. C-level prospects are familiar with your brand. If they haven’t experienced it themselves, they can quickly gather information about you online.

What you can do: Ensure that your service delivery and brand experience match your marketing messages. If there’s been a known issue, be prepared to address it when you meet with C-level players. Research your brand online and in social media. And research your competition. You might find an opportunity.

2) C-level executives are part of the “always-on” work ethic. Ever wonder at how our nation’s leaders maintain seemingly non-stop schedules of meetings, travel and public appearances? Successful pop stars, actors, consultants and other top performers are the same way. While many c-level decision-makers maintain a healthy work-life balance, they do not “turn it off” when going home. The thinking goes on round the clock. So if your marketing messages have sticking power, or can be reviewed easily at 1:30 a.m., you’re more likely to be considered.

What you can do: We’re not talking about midnight candygrams to the CEO’s house. But you might test emails that arrive after business hours, printed pieces that look more like magazines and have after-hours appeal, or mobile marketing someone can play with anytime.

3) C-suite executives are changing roles and positions faster. According to Forbes magazine, CMO tenure is now about 43 months, not even four years. Other c-levels may stay in their positions longer. But the fact is, top performers are ambitious and in high demand. So they move around a lot.

What you can do: It comes down to contact verification. If you’re spending money on high-level marketing programs, your first dollars should go toward confirming the names, titles and roles of the decision-makers you want to reach. This is your chance to look really smart with relevant, personalized communications. In fact, if you take the time to conduct in-depth interview calls with a portion of the audience, you’ll glean even more insights that can improve your messaging effectiveness.

4) More collaborative than ever. There are still plenty of highly charismatic leaders who drive entire companies through sheer force of will. (Most recently, Steve Jobs comes to mind). But more 122413525_two-execs-on-stairs-500pxoften, decision-making in a c-suite is done as a collective. Three or more brains are smarter than one. And when you have shareholders, board leadership, compliance officers and employee oversight to consider, it’s just a good idea to share the weight of directional decisions. The downside for marketers? You have to win over several leaders in any prospect organization.

What you can do: By encouraging and even facilitating conversations among the most logical decision-makers, you can position yourself as a collaborator who not only understands the value of a group decision, but how to get there. Messaging should be tailored to the interests of each stakeholder, but reflective of the ultimate goals of the organization.

5) Mobile, mobile, mobile. It’s easy to assume that c-suite leaders are the last to adopt new technology. And it’s true that their social media participation can be lower than their younger counterparts. But the smart phone and tablet explosion is in some ways being led by these fast-moving, high-powered executives. They love the empowering convenience of it. Their schedules and duties require it. They can afford to try the latest gadgets. And they’re smart, so learning new operating systems every 18 months is not a barrier.

What you can do: Think mobile first. If you’re designing a website, be sure that responsive design is built into the specs. If you’re creating emails, optimize for mobile viewing. Apps are a great idea, as long as they offer real user value and do not require too much commitment. Digital white papers and e-books make great airplane reading on a tablet. There are many new mobile advertising opportunities to consider. And the possibilities with augmented reality at a trade show or exclusive event are seeming endless. So if you’re looking to reach c-levels, remember that their mobile devices may be the most direct route.

Bottom Line on Top Executives

Something that hasn’t changed but is very important to remember: C-level contacts in b2b marketing campaigns are people just like you and me. They have families. They have hobbies. Sure, they have the heavy responsibilities of steering massive organizations. But their decision-making calculus is still human and often emotional. Never forget you’re talking to a person.

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Enhanced by Zemanta

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

C-Level Decision-Makers: 5 Ways to Reach Them.

100992526_CEO-Type-500pxIn the world of B2B, the holy grail is the  “C-level”  or C-suite.

If you’re marketing to chiefs or C-level executives — CEOs, CIOs, COOs, CFOs, CMOs, etc. — you’ve probably have noticed some significant changes in recent years. Some of those changes make it more difficult to contact these important C-level decision-makers. Some actually make it easier.  Here are five ways the C-suite landscape has changed…and how marketers can leverage them for the greatest impact.

1) The customer decision journey is changing. According to Jonathan Gordan at McKinsey Partners, the notion of “moments of truth” is more important than ever. And many of those moments of truth are related to service delivery and brand experience. Which means the onus goes well beyond marketing communications. C-level prospects are familiar with your brand. If they haven’t experienced it themselves, they can quickly gather information about you online.

What you can do: Ensure that your service delivery and brand experience match your marketing messages. If there’s been a known issue, be prepared to address it when you meet with C-level players. Research your brand online and in social media. And research your competition. You might find an opportunity.

2) C-level executives are part of the “always-on” work ethic. Ever wonder at how our nation’s leaders maintain seemingly non-stop schedules of meetings, travel and public appearances? Successful pop stars, actors, consultants and other top performers are the same way. While many c-level decision-makers maintain a healthy work-life balance, they do not “turn it off” when going home. The thinking goes on round the clock. So if your marketing messages have sticking power, or can be reviewed easily at 1:30 a.m., you’re more likely to be considered.

What you can do: We’re not talking about midnight candygrams to the CEO’s house. But you might test emails that arrive after business hours, printed pieces that look more like magazines and have after-hours appeal, or mobile marketing someone can play with anytime.

3) C-suite executives are changing roles and positions faster. According to Forbes magazine, CMO tenure is now about 43 months, not even four years. Other c-levels may stay in their positions longer. But the fact is, top performers are ambitious and in high demand. So they move around a lot.

What you can do: It comes down to contact verification. If you’re spending money on high-level marketing programs, your first dollars should go toward confirming the names, titles and roles of the decision-makers you want to reach. This is your chance to look really smart with relevant, personalized communications. In fact, if you take the time to conduct in-depth interview calls with a portion of the audience, you’ll glean even more insights that can improve your messaging effectiveness.

4) More collaborative than ever. There are still plenty of highly charismatic leaders who drive entire companies through sheer force of will. (Most recently, Steve Jobs comes to mind). But more 122413525_two-execs-on-stairs-500pxoften, decision-making in a c-suite is done as a collective. Three or more brains are smarter than one. And when you have shareholders, board leadership, compliance officers and employee oversight to consider, it’s just a good idea to share the weight of directional decisions. The downside for marketers? You have to win over several leaders in any prospect organization.

What you can do: By encouraging and even facilitating conversations among the most logical decision-makers, you can position yourself as a collaborator who not only understands the value of a group decision, but how to get there. Messaging should be tailored to the interests of each stakeholder, but reflective of the ultimate goals of the organization.

5) Mobile, mobile, mobile. It’s easy to assume that c-suite leaders are the last to adopt new technology. And it’s true that their social media participation can be lower than their younger counterparts. But the smart phone and tablet explosion is in some ways being led by these fast-moving, high-powered executives. They love the empowering convenience of it. Their schedules and duties require it. They can afford to try the latest gadgets. And they’re smart, so learning new operating systems every 18 months is not a barrier.

What you can do: Think mobile first. If you’re designing a website, be sure that responsive design is built into the specs. If you’re creating emails, optimize for mobile viewing. Apps are a great idea, as long as they offer real user value and do not require too much commitment. Digital white papers and e-books make great airplane reading on a tablet. There are many new mobile advertising opportunities to consider. And the possibilities with augmented reality at a trade show or exclusive event are seeming endless. So if you’re looking to reach c-levels, remember that their mobile devices may be the most direct route.

Bottom Line on Top Executives

Something that hasn’t changed but is very important to remember: C-level contacts in b2b marketing campaigns are people just like you and me. They have families. They have hobbies. Sure, they have the heavy responsibilities of steering massive organizations. But their decision-making calculus is still human and often emotional. Never forget you’re talking to a person.

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