Can’t we all just get along? Why understanding both sides could fix the journalism/PR relationship

ThinkstockPhotos-475277216When it comes to journalism and public relations, although they work hand in hand, the two fields aren’t exactly the best of friends. We all know journalists find PR specialists to be a nuisance, and vice versa. I’ve seen both sides (albeit on a much smaller scale) as an editor at my college’s newspaper and as a PR intern.  From the dreaded follow-up call to the ignored pitch, I’ll break down why taking a look at both sides of the story might help PR specialists and journalists learn from one another, making this inevitable relationship a little easier to deal with.

Think like a reporter

I once had an alumna from my school come into my office convinced she should be on the front page, but in all reality, her story really wasn’t newsworthy. When pitching a story or press release, think about your audience. If you were a reporter, would you want to write 1,000-plus words on the construction of a new office building or the new-product-that-is-basically-the-same-as-the-last-one-but-with-a-new-name announcement?

… and like a PR specialist

As a journalist, you still have to appreciate our enthusiasm, right? If we took the time to pitch it, maybe there’s a story in there after all. So yes, that story about a new project win or company award may seem a little boring, but don’t completely write us off. Plus, if you ignore our email, you know you’ll receive that dreaded call—which brings me to my next point.

Give the follow-up caller a break

We know you hate the follow-up call. But we have to make the follow-up call. So give the follow-up caller a break, alright? We know you’re busy and we know you saw our email, but as PR specialists, it’s our job to make the reporter’s job as easy as possible. Seriously, we’re here to give you interviews, photos and content for your publication!

… But make that follow-up call interesting

Starting the conversation out with “I just wanted to follow up with you on the email I sent you last week …” may actually do the opposite of what we’re trying to do. Put a spin on it or add in a detail that wasn’t in the pitch that might pique the journalist’s interest. Whatever you do, don’t repeat the pitch or press release verbatim—if they didn’t respond to the email, what makes you think they’ll respond to its reiteration?

Do your research

Get to know your audience, the publication and the journalist to whom you’re sending your pitch. The publication might be a good fit for your topic, but is the journalist? What’s their beat? What does the publication usually cover? Will your audience care? These are the questions to ask before you even write a press release.

This isn’t to say this one blog post from a former college newspaper editor and PR intern will put aside decades of grudges, but the next time you send or receive a pitch, remember the other side’s point of view—it might make this process a little more bearable, maybe even valuable, for all of us.

How can we help you make change?

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Can’t we all just get along? Why understanding both sides could fix the journalism/PR relationship

ThinkstockPhotos-475277216When it comes to journalism and public relations, although they work hand in hand, the two fields aren’t exactly the best of friends. We all know journalists find PR specialists to be a nuisance, and vice versa. I’ve seen both sides (albeit on a much smaller scale) as an editor at my college’s newspaper and as a PR intern.  From the dreaded follow-up call to the ignored pitch, I’ll break down why taking a look at both sides of the story might help PR specialists and journalists learn from one another, making this inevitable relationship a little easier to deal with.

Think like a reporter

I once had an alumna from my school come into my office convinced she should be on the front page, but in all reality, her story really wasn’t newsworthy. When pitching a story or press release, think about your audience. If you were a reporter, would you want to write 1,000-plus words on the construction of a new office building or the new-product-that-is-basically-the-same-as-the-last-one-but-with-a-new-name announcement?

… and like a PR specialist

As a journalist, you still have to appreciate our enthusiasm, right? If we took the time to pitch it, maybe there’s a story in there after all. So yes, that story about a new project win or company award may seem a little boring, but don’t completely write us off. Plus, if you ignore our email, you know you’ll receive that dreaded call—which brings me to my next point.

Give the follow-up caller a break

We know you hate the follow-up call. But we have to make the follow-up call. So give the follow-up caller a break, alright? We know you’re busy and we know you saw our email, but as PR specialists, it’s our job to make the reporter’s job as easy as possible. Seriously, we’re here to give you interviews, photos and content for your publication!

… But make that follow-up call interesting

Starting the conversation out with “I just wanted to follow up with you on the email I sent you last week …” may actually do the opposite of what we’re trying to do. Put a spin on it or add in a detail that wasn’t in the pitch that might pique the journalist’s interest. Whatever you do, don’t repeat the pitch or press release verbatim—if they didn’t respond to the email, what makes you think they’ll respond to its reiteration?

Do your research

Get to know your audience, the publication and the journalist to whom you’re sending your pitch. The publication might be a good fit for your topic, but is the journalist? What’s their beat? What does the publication usually cover? Will your audience care? These are the questions to ask before you even write a press release.

This isn’t to say this one blog post from a former college newspaper editor and PR intern will put aside decades of grudges, but the next time you send or receive a pitch, remember the other side’s point of view—it might make this process a little more bearable, maybe even valuable, for all of us.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Can’t we all just get along? Why understanding both sides could fix the journalism/PR relationship

ThinkstockPhotos-475277216When it comes to journalism and public relations, although they work hand in hand, the two fields aren’t exactly the best of friends. We all know journalists find PR specialists to be a nuisance, and vice versa. I’ve seen both sides (albeit on a much smaller scale) as an editor at my college’s newspaper and as a PR intern.  From the dreaded follow-up call to the ignored pitch, I’ll break down why taking a look at both sides of the story might help PR specialists and journalists learn from one another, making this inevitable relationship a little easier to deal with.

Think like a reporter

I once had an alumna from my school come into my office convinced she should be on the front page, but in all reality, her story really wasn’t newsworthy. When pitching a story or press release, think about your audience. If you were a reporter, would you want to write 1,000-plus words on the construction of a new office building or the new-product-that-is-basically-the-same-as-the-last-one-but-with-a-new-name announcement?

… and like a PR specialist

As a journalist, you still have to appreciate our enthusiasm, right? If we took the time to pitch it, maybe there’s a story in there after all. So yes, that story about a new project win or company award may seem a little boring, but don’t completely write us off. Plus, if you ignore our email, you know you’ll receive that dreaded call—which brings me to my next point.

Give the follow-up caller a break

We know you hate the follow-up call. But we have to make the follow-up call. So give the follow-up caller a break, alright? We know you’re busy and we know you saw our email, but as PR specialists, it’s our job to make the reporter’s job as easy as possible. Seriously, we’re here to give you interviews, photos and content for your publication!

… But make that follow-up call interesting

Starting the conversation out with “I just wanted to follow up with you on the email I sent you last week …” may actually do the opposite of what we’re trying to do. Put a spin on it or add in a detail that wasn’t in the pitch that might pique the journalist’s interest. Whatever you do, don’t repeat the pitch or press release verbatim—if they didn’t respond to the email, what makes you think they’ll respond to its reiteration?

Do your research

Get to know your audience, the publication and the journalist to whom you’re sending your pitch. The publication might be a good fit for your topic, but is the journalist? What’s their beat? What does the publication usually cover? Will your audience care? These are the questions to ask before you even write a press release.

This isn’t to say this one blog post from a former college newspaper editor and PR intern will put aside decades of grudges, but the next time you send or receive a pitch, remember the other side’s point of view—it might make this process a little more bearable, maybe even valuable, for all of us.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Can’t we all just get along? Why understanding both sides could fix the journalism/PR relationship

ThinkstockPhotos-475277216When it comes to journalism and public relations, although they work hand in hand, the two fields aren’t exactly the best of friends. We all know journalists find PR specialists to be a nuisance, and vice versa. I’ve seen both sides (albeit on a much smaller scale) as an editor at my college’s newspaper and as a PR intern.  From the dreaded follow-up call to the ignored pitch, I’ll break down why taking a look at both sides of the story might help PR specialists and journalists learn from one another, making this inevitable relationship a little easier to deal with.

Think like a reporter

I once had an alumna from my school come into my office convinced she should be on the front page, but in all reality, her story really wasn’t newsworthy. When pitching a story or press release, think about your audience. If you were a reporter, would you want to write 1,000-plus words on the construction of a new office building or the new-product-that-is-basically-the-same-as-the-last-one-but-with-a-new-name announcement?

… and like a PR specialist

As a journalist, you still have to appreciate our enthusiasm, right? If we took the time to pitch it, maybe there’s a story in there after all. So yes, that story about a new project win or company award may seem a little boring, but don’t completely write us off. Plus, if you ignore our email, you know you’ll receive that dreaded call—which brings me to my next point.

Give the follow-up caller a break

We know you hate the follow-up call. But we have to make the follow-up call. So give the follow-up caller a break, alright? We know you’re busy and we know you saw our email, but as PR specialists, it’s our job to make the reporter’s job as easy as possible. Seriously, we’re here to give you interviews, photos and content for your publication!

… But make that follow-up call interesting

Starting the conversation out with “I just wanted to follow up with you on the email I sent you last week …” may actually do the opposite of what we’re trying to do. Put a spin on it or add in a detail that wasn’t in the pitch that might pique the journalist’s interest. Whatever you do, don’t repeat the pitch or press release verbatim—if they didn’t respond to the email, what makes you think they’ll respond to its reiteration?

Do your research

Get to know your audience, the publication and the journalist to whom you’re sending your pitch. The publication might be a good fit for your topic, but is the journalist? What’s their beat? What does the publication usually cover? Will your audience care? These are the questions to ask before you even write a press release.

This isn’t to say this one blog post from a former college newspaper editor and PR intern will put aside decades of grudges, but the next time you send or receive a pitch, remember the other side’s point of view—it might make this process a little more bearable, maybe even valuable, for all of us.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Can’t we all just get along? Why understanding both sides could fix the journalism/PR relationship

ThinkstockPhotos-475277216When it comes to journalism and public relations, although they work hand in hand, the two fields aren’t exactly the best of friends. We all know journalists find PR specialists to be a nuisance, and vice versa. I’ve seen both sides (albeit on a much smaller scale) as an editor at my college’s newspaper and as a PR intern.  From the dreaded follow-up call to the ignored pitch, I’ll break down why taking a look at both sides of the story might help PR specialists and journalists learn from one another, making this inevitable relationship a little easier to deal with.

Think like a reporter

I once had an alumna from my school come into my office convinced she should be on the front page, but in all reality, her story really wasn’t newsworthy. When pitching a story or press release, think about your audience. If you were a reporter, would you want to write 1,000-plus words on the construction of a new office building or the new-product-that-is-basically-the-same-as-the-last-one-but-with-a-new-name announcement?

… and like a PR specialist

As a journalist, you still have to appreciate our enthusiasm, right? If we took the time to pitch it, maybe there’s a story in there after all. So yes, that story about a new project win or company award may seem a little boring, but don’t completely write us off. Plus, if you ignore our email, you know you’ll receive that dreaded call—which brings me to my next point.

Give the follow-up caller a break

We know you hate the follow-up call. But we have to make the follow-up call. So give the follow-up caller a break, alright? We know you’re busy and we know you saw our email, but as PR specialists, it’s our job to make the reporter’s job as easy as possible. Seriously, we’re here to give you interviews, photos and content for your publication!

… But make that follow-up call interesting

Starting the conversation out with “I just wanted to follow up with you on the email I sent you last week …” may actually do the opposite of what we’re trying to do. Put a spin on it or add in a detail that wasn’t in the pitch that might pique the journalist’s interest. Whatever you do, don’t repeat the pitch or press release verbatim—if they didn’t respond to the email, what makes you think they’ll respond to its reiteration?

Do your research

Get to know your audience, the publication and the journalist to whom you’re sending your pitch. The publication might be a good fit for your topic, but is the journalist? What’s their beat? What does the publication usually cover? Will your audience care? These are the questions to ask before you even write a press release.

This isn’t to say this one blog post from a former college newspaper editor and PR intern will put aside decades of grudges, but the next time you send or receive a pitch, remember the other side’s point of view—it might make this process a little more bearable, maybe even valuable, for all of us.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Can’t we all just get along? Why understanding both sides could fix the journalism/PR relationship

ThinkstockPhotos-475277216When it comes to journalism and public relations, although they work hand in hand, the two fields aren’t exactly the best of friends. We all know journalists find PR specialists to be a nuisance, and vice versa. I’ve seen both sides (albeit on a much smaller scale) as an editor at my college’s newspaper and as a PR intern.  From the dreaded follow-up call to the ignored pitch, I’ll break down why taking a look at both sides of the story might help PR specialists and journalists learn from one another, making this inevitable relationship a little easier to deal with.

Think like a reporter

I once had an alumna from my school come into my office convinced she should be on the front page, but in all reality, her story really wasn’t newsworthy. When pitching a story or press release, think about your audience. If you were a reporter, would you want to write 1,000-plus words on the construction of a new office building or the new-product-that-is-basically-the-same-as-the-last-one-but-with-a-new-name announcement?

… and like a PR specialist

As a journalist, you still have to appreciate our enthusiasm, right? If we took the time to pitch it, maybe there’s a story in there after all. So yes, that story about a new project win or company award may seem a little boring, but don’t completely write us off. Plus, if you ignore our email, you know you’ll receive that dreaded call—which brings me to my next point.

Give the follow-up caller a break

We know you hate the follow-up call. But we have to make the follow-up call. So give the follow-up caller a break, alright? We know you’re busy and we know you saw our email, but as PR specialists, it’s our job to make the reporter’s job as easy as possible. Seriously, we’re here to give you interviews, photos and content for your publication!

… But make that follow-up call interesting

Starting the conversation out with “I just wanted to follow up with you on the email I sent you last week …” may actually do the opposite of what we’re trying to do. Put a spin on it or add in a detail that wasn’t in the pitch that might pique the journalist’s interest. Whatever you do, don’t repeat the pitch or press release verbatim—if they didn’t respond to the email, what makes you think they’ll respond to its reiteration?

Do your research

Get to know your audience, the publication and the journalist to whom you’re sending your pitch. The publication might be a good fit for your topic, but is the journalist? What’s their beat? What does the publication usually cover? Will your audience care? These are the questions to ask before you even write a press release.

This isn’t to say this one blog post from a former college newspaper editor and PR intern will put aside decades of grudges, but the next time you send or receive a pitch, remember the other side’s point of view—it might make this process a little more bearable, maybe even valuable, for all of us.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Can’t we all just get along? Why understanding both sides could fix the journalism/PR relationship

ThinkstockPhotos-475277216When it comes to journalism and public relations, although they work hand in hand, the two fields aren’t exactly the best of friends. We all know journalists find PR specialists to be a nuisance, and vice versa. I’ve seen both sides (albeit on a much smaller scale) as an editor at my college’s newspaper and as a PR intern.  From the dreaded follow-up call to the ignored pitch, I’ll break down why taking a look at both sides of the story might help PR specialists and journalists learn from one another, making this inevitable relationship a little easier to deal with.

Think like a reporter

I once had an alumna from my school come into my office convinced she should be on the front page, but in all reality, her story really wasn’t newsworthy. When pitching a story or press release, think about your audience. If you were a reporter, would you want to write 1,000-plus words on the construction of a new office building or the new-product-that-is-basically-the-same-as-the-last-one-but-with-a-new-name announcement?

… and like a PR specialist

As a journalist, you still have to appreciate our enthusiasm, right? If we took the time to pitch it, maybe there’s a story in there after all. So yes, that story about a new project win or company award may seem a little boring, but don’t completely write us off. Plus, if you ignore our email, you know you’ll receive that dreaded call—which brings me to my next point.

Give the follow-up caller a break

We know you hate the follow-up call. But we have to make the follow-up call. So give the follow-up caller a break, alright? We know you’re busy and we know you saw our email, but as PR specialists, it’s our job to make the reporter’s job as easy as possible. Seriously, we’re here to give you interviews, photos and content for your publication!

… But make that follow-up call interesting

Starting the conversation out with “I just wanted to follow up with you on the email I sent you last week …” may actually do the opposite of what we’re trying to do. Put a spin on it or add in a detail that wasn’t in the pitch that might pique the journalist’s interest. Whatever you do, don’t repeat the pitch or press release verbatim—if they didn’t respond to the email, what makes you think they’ll respond to its reiteration?

Do your research

Get to know your audience, the publication and the journalist to whom you’re sending your pitch. The publication might be a good fit for your topic, but is the journalist? What’s their beat? What does the publication usually cover? Will your audience care? These are the questions to ask before you even write a press release.

This isn’t to say this one blog post from a former college newspaper editor and PR intern will put aside decades of grudges, but the next time you send or receive a pitch, remember the other side’s point of view—it might make this process a little more bearable, maybe even valuable, for all of us.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *