Did you see that email?

You get to work, open up the laptop and there it is. An inbox full of emails. To some, it’s a #firstworldproblem, to Email Marketers, it’s a challenge. Here are some insights to help you accept the challenge:

1. FROM the start

It’s the first thing they see: your email FROM name. About 55% of digital citizens around the world avoid opening emails from unknown email addresses (Ipsos). If you’re getting B2B emails from punkrocker85@donald.com, it’s probably headed to the trash department. Look to include your brand name, a name of a major figurehead recipients will recognize or a general title on the subject matter like Engineering Services.

2. Quality vs. Quantity

It’s an age-old battle. Database companies will tout 20,000 subscribers, but more often than not those aren’t the quality leads you want. With the digital data possibilities today, look to divide your data based on strategy with segments like Job Title, Country, State and Postal Code. Review the data before and after hitting send. Check for multiple people within the same organization. Some will automatically block email marketing efforts because of too many hitting their server as a safety precaution. Afterward, check the bounce rate and then speak to your data house on making up for the invalid emails you purchased.

3. Timing is everything

Reports will vary between industries and segments. In general, look to have no Mondays and no Fridays. No one wants to read your pitch when they are beginning and ending their week. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday are your best bet. 24% of emails are opened within the first hour (GetResponse) so try to hit their inboxes between 10:00–11:00 a.m. and 2:00–4:00 p.m. when they aren’t out to lunch or busy getting through the muck at the beginning of the day. Look to A/B test wherever possible in your campaign and check your time zones.

4. Short. Concise. And not every day.

Everyone’s busy. Get to the point. Provide a link for more info. Space out communications. 35% of people said receiving emails too often was the main reason for unsubscribing (Fluent).

5. Optimize for mobile

If you have a smartphone, which you are probably using to read this blog, then you know the significance of optimizing for mobile. 62% of Americans primarily use their smartphones to check email, and the number jumps to 73% when you get into the millennial demographic (Fluent). Stay current. Go mobile.

How can we help you make change?

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Leave a Reply

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Did you see that email?

You get to work, open up the laptop and there it is. An inbox full of emails. To some, it’s a #firstworldproblem, to Email Marketers, it’s a challenge. Here are some insights to help you accept the challenge:

1. FROM the start

It’s the first thing they see: your email FROM name. About 55% of digital citizens around the world avoid opening emails from unknown email addresses (Ipsos). If you’re getting B2B emails from punkrocker85@donald.com, it’s probably headed to the trash department. Look to include your brand name, a name of a major figurehead recipients will recognize or a general title on the subject matter like Engineering Services.

2. Quality vs. Quantity

It’s an age-old battle. Database companies will tout 20,000 subscribers, but more often than not those aren’t the quality leads you want. With the digital data possibilities today, look to divide your data based on strategy with segments like Job Title, Country, State and Postal Code. Review the data before and after hitting send. Check for multiple people within the same organization. Some will automatically block email marketing efforts because of too many hitting their server as a safety precaution. Afterward, check the bounce rate and then speak to your data house on making up for the invalid emails you purchased.

3. Timing is everything

Reports will vary between industries and segments. In general, look to have no Mondays and no Fridays. No one wants to read your pitch when they are beginning and ending their week. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday are your best bet. 24% of emails are opened within the first hour (GetResponse) so try to hit their inboxes between 10:00–11:00 a.m. and 2:00–4:00 p.m. when they aren’t out to lunch or busy getting through the muck at the beginning of the day. Look to A/B test wherever possible in your campaign and check your time zones.

4. Short. Concise. And not every day.

Everyone’s busy. Get to the point. Provide a link for more info. Space out communications. 35% of people said receiving emails too often was the main reason for unsubscribing (Fluent).

5. Optimize for mobile

If you have a smartphone, which you are probably using to read this blog, then you know the significance of optimizing for mobile. 62% of Americans primarily use their smartphones to check email, and the number jumps to 73% when you get into the millennial demographic (Fluent). Stay current. Go mobile.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Did you see that email?

You get to work, open up the laptop and there it is. An inbox full of emails. To some, it’s a #firstworldproblem, to Email Marketers, it’s a challenge. Here are some insights to help you accept the challenge:

1. FROM the start

It’s the first thing they see: your email FROM name. About 55% of digital citizens around the world avoid opening emails from unknown email addresses (Ipsos). If you’re getting B2B emails from punkrocker85@donald.com, it’s probably headed to the trash department. Look to include your brand name, a name of a major figurehead recipients will recognize or a general title on the subject matter like Engineering Services.

2. Quality vs. Quantity

It’s an age-old battle. Database companies will tout 20,000 subscribers, but more often than not those aren’t the quality leads you want. With the digital data possibilities today, look to divide your data based on strategy with segments like Job Title, Country, State and Postal Code. Review the data before and after hitting send. Check for multiple people within the same organization. Some will automatically block email marketing efforts because of too many hitting their server as a safety precaution. Afterward, check the bounce rate and then speak to your data house on making up for the invalid emails you purchased.

3. Timing is everything

Reports will vary between industries and segments. In general, look to have no Mondays and no Fridays. No one wants to read your pitch when they are beginning and ending their week. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday are your best bet. 24% of emails are opened within the first hour (GetResponse) so try to hit their inboxes between 10:00–11:00 a.m. and 2:00–4:00 p.m. when they aren’t out to lunch or busy getting through the muck at the beginning of the day. Look to A/B test wherever possible in your campaign and check your time zones.

4. Short. Concise. And not every day.

Everyone’s busy. Get to the point. Provide a link for more info. Space out communications. 35% of people said receiving emails too often was the main reason for unsubscribing (Fluent).

5. Optimize for mobile

If you have a smartphone, which you are probably using to read this blog, then you know the significance of optimizing for mobile. 62% of Americans primarily use their smartphones to check email, and the number jumps to 73% when you get into the millennial demographic (Fluent). Stay current. Go mobile.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Did you see that email?

You get to work, open up the laptop and there it is. An inbox full of emails. To some, it’s a #firstworldproblem, to Email Marketers, it’s a challenge. Here are some insights to help you accept the challenge:

1. FROM the start

It’s the first thing they see: your email FROM name. About 55% of digital citizens around the world avoid opening emails from unknown email addresses (Ipsos). If you’re getting B2B emails from punkrocker85@donald.com, it’s probably headed to the trash department. Look to include your brand name, a name of a major figurehead recipients will recognize or a general title on the subject matter like Engineering Services.

2. Quality vs. Quantity

It’s an age-old battle. Database companies will tout 20,000 subscribers, but more often than not those aren’t the quality leads you want. With the digital data possibilities today, look to divide your data based on strategy with segments like Job Title, Country, State and Postal Code. Review the data before and after hitting send. Check for multiple people within the same organization. Some will automatically block email marketing efforts because of too many hitting their server as a safety precaution. Afterward, check the bounce rate and then speak to your data house on making up for the invalid emails you purchased.

3. Timing is everything

Reports will vary between industries and segments. In general, look to have no Mondays and no Fridays. No one wants to read your pitch when they are beginning and ending their week. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday are your best bet. 24% of emails are opened within the first hour (GetResponse) so try to hit their inboxes between 10:00–11:00 a.m. and 2:00–4:00 p.m. when they aren’t out to lunch or busy getting through the muck at the beginning of the day. Look to A/B test wherever possible in your campaign and check your time zones.

4. Short. Concise. And not every day.

Everyone’s busy. Get to the point. Provide a link for more info. Space out communications. 35% of people said receiving emails too often was the main reason for unsubscribing (Fluent).

5. Optimize for mobile

If you have a smartphone, which you are probably using to read this blog, then you know the significance of optimizing for mobile. 62% of Americans primarily use their smartphones to check email, and the number jumps to 73% when you get into the millennial demographic (Fluent). Stay current. Go mobile.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *