Employee Engagement: The next-level of recruitment strategy.

kevin_blog_gif-fileThe “War for Talent” continues to rage on throughout many industries as HR departments face competition from other employers and the prospective employees (who’ve become brand customers) themselves. To strengthen your employer branding, look to use your internal employee engagement strategies. We’ve seen that engaged employees are your best brand advocates.

As prospects for major companies have technologically advanced capabilities for researching, following and sharing company culture, the HR department is becoming more transparent while working with marketing departments to improve brand image. Eighty-seven percent of organizations cite culture and engagement as one of their top challenges.1

With only 25% of the global workforce feeling highly engaged2, it’s no surprise that job hopping has become the norm. To get it right, the most effective strategies come from the top-down. Employers are starting to empower their teams, holding the team leaders responsible for engagement. Now, you need to give them the right tools to do that!

Consider finding out where you are right now by implementing Employee Engagement Surveys. But be mindful that while 64 percent of organizations only measure employee engagement annually3, you should be doing it quarterly at the very least for continuous improvement. Once you level set, look to turn insights into action.

“Learning our language” is the first step of assimilation into company culture. Quicken Loans has a great example of how to help culture thrive with the first step in the door, an unofficial handbook. Just ask us here at Roberts to see our culture-defining guidebook. Although tough to narrow, corporate cultures need to be defined, and recognition should be values-based using those definitions. If you stand for creating powerfully effective work, giving back or plainly giving a damn, then make sure that is the basis for your recognition.

Eighty-one percent of companies are practicing formal recognition programs and the most effective programs are spending 1.5–1.9% of their payroll on recognition4. Sounds like it’s time to step up the recognition game. Recognition opportunities are everywhere you look with standards being Year of Service (YOS) anniversaries, birthdays, holidays or for consistently giving a damn. Effective social media strategies provoke emotion. Pair that with your employee, and you’ve got some good employer branding content.

It’s really a snowball effect allowing employee engagement to become a solid marketing investment. The more you invest in your employees, the happier and more productive they become.5 This builds office loyalty, transforming them into internal (and external) brand ambassadors. Once they are established, you can tap them for success stories, leadership role highlights, speaking events and maybe even alumni relations. Remember, in HR, you’re running the long game.

While traditionally you think of employer branding as an external marketing effort, the most organic, effective ways to secure a solid culture reputation is from within. Throughout each internal touch point, you should be generating social assets, dynamic photos, touting community service and consistently listening to the boots on the ground. Your employees can become your marketable opportunities.

  1. Culture and engagement: The naked organization, Deloitte University Press, 2015
  2. Aon Hewitt 2016 Trends in Global Employee Engagement
  3. Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends 2016
  4. SHRM/Globoforce Survey 2015 Employee Recognition Report
  5. SBA Workplace Index 2016

 

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Employee Engagement: The next-level of recruitment strategy.

kevin_blog_gif-fileThe “War for Talent” continues to rage on throughout many industries as HR departments face competition from other employers and the prospective employees (who’ve become brand customers) themselves. To strengthen your employer branding, look to use your internal employee engagement strategies. We’ve seen that engaged employees are your best brand advocates.

As prospects for major companies have technologically advanced capabilities for researching, following and sharing company culture, the HR department is becoming more transparent while working with marketing departments to improve brand image. Eighty-seven percent of organizations cite culture and engagement as one of their top challenges.1

With only 25% of the global workforce feeling highly engaged2, it’s no surprise that job hopping has become the norm. To get it right, the most effective strategies come from the top-down. Employers are starting to empower their teams, holding the team leaders responsible for engagement. Now, you need to give them the right tools to do that!

Consider finding out where you are right now by implementing Employee Engagement Surveys. But be mindful that while 64 percent of organizations only measure employee engagement annually3, you should be doing it quarterly at the very least for continuous improvement. Once you level set, look to turn insights into action.

“Learning our language” is the first step of assimilation into company culture. Quicken Loans has a great example of how to help culture thrive with the first step in the door, an unofficial handbook. Just ask us here at Roberts to see our culture-defining guidebook. Although tough to narrow, corporate cultures need to be defined, and recognition should be values-based using those definitions. If you stand for creating powerfully effective work, giving back or plainly giving a damn, then make sure that is the basis for your recognition.

Eighty-one percent of companies are practicing formal recognition programs and the most effective programs are spending 1.5–1.9% of their payroll on recognition4. Sounds like it’s time to step up the recognition game. Recognition opportunities are everywhere you look with standards being Year of Service (YOS) anniversaries, birthdays, holidays or for consistently giving a damn. Effective social media strategies provoke emotion. Pair that with your employee, and you’ve got some good employer branding content.

It’s really a snowball effect allowing employee engagement to become a solid marketing investment. The more you invest in your employees, the happier and more productive they become.5 This builds office loyalty, transforming them into internal (and external) brand ambassadors. Once they are established, you can tap them for success stories, leadership role highlights, speaking events and maybe even alumni relations. Remember, in HR, you’re running the long game.

While traditionally you think of employer branding as an external marketing effort, the most organic, effective ways to secure a solid culture reputation is from within. Throughout each internal touch point, you should be generating social assets, dynamic photos, touting community service and consistently listening to the boots on the ground. Your employees can become your marketable opportunities.

  1. Culture and engagement: The naked organization, Deloitte University Press, 2015
  2. Aon Hewitt 2016 Trends in Global Employee Engagement
  3. Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends 2016
  4. SHRM/Globoforce Survey 2015 Employee Recognition Report
  5. SBA Workplace Index 2016

 

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Employee Engagement: The next-level of recruitment strategy.

kevin_blog_gif-fileThe “War for Talent” continues to rage on throughout many industries as HR departments face competition from other employers and the prospective employees (who’ve become brand customers) themselves. To strengthen your employer branding, look to use your internal employee engagement strategies. We’ve seen that engaged employees are your best brand advocates.

As prospects for major companies have technologically advanced capabilities for researching, following and sharing company culture, the HR department is becoming more transparent while working with marketing departments to improve brand image. Eighty-seven percent of organizations cite culture and engagement as one of their top challenges.1

With only 25% of the global workforce feeling highly engaged2, it’s no surprise that job hopping has become the norm. To get it right, the most effective strategies come from the top-down. Employers are starting to empower their teams, holding the team leaders responsible for engagement. Now, you need to give them the right tools to do that!

Consider finding out where you are right now by implementing Employee Engagement Surveys. But be mindful that while 64 percent of organizations only measure employee engagement annually3, you should be doing it quarterly at the very least for continuous improvement. Once you level set, look to turn insights into action.

“Learning our language” is the first step of assimilation into company culture. Quicken Loans has a great example of how to help culture thrive with the first step in the door, an unofficial handbook. Just ask us here at Roberts to see our culture-defining guidebook. Although tough to narrow, corporate cultures need to be defined, and recognition should be values-based using those definitions. If you stand for creating powerfully effective work, giving back or plainly giving a damn, then make sure that is the basis for your recognition.

Eighty-one percent of companies are practicing formal recognition programs and the most effective programs are spending 1.5–1.9% of their payroll on recognition4. Sounds like it’s time to step up the recognition game. Recognition opportunities are everywhere you look with standards being Year of Service (YOS) anniversaries, birthdays, holidays or for consistently giving a damn. Effective social media strategies provoke emotion. Pair that with your employee, and you’ve got some good employer branding content.

It’s really a snowball effect allowing employee engagement to become a solid marketing investment. The more you invest in your employees, the happier and more productive they become.5 This builds office loyalty, transforming them into internal (and external) brand ambassadors. Once they are established, you can tap them for success stories, leadership role highlights, speaking events and maybe even alumni relations. Remember, in HR, you’re running the long game.

While traditionally you think of employer branding as an external marketing effort, the most organic, effective ways to secure a solid culture reputation is from within. Throughout each internal touch point, you should be generating social assets, dynamic photos, touting community service and consistently listening to the boots on the ground. Your employees can become your marketable opportunities.

  1. Culture and engagement: The naked organization, Deloitte University Press, 2015
  2. Aon Hewitt 2016 Trends in Global Employee Engagement
  3. Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends 2016
  4. SHRM/Globoforce Survey 2015 Employee Recognition Report
  5. SBA Workplace Index 2016

 

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Employee Engagement: The next-level of recruitment strategy.

kevin_blog_gif-fileThe “War for Talent” continues to rage on throughout many industries as HR departments face competition from other employers and the prospective employees (who’ve become brand customers) themselves. To strengthen your employer branding, look to use your internal employee engagement strategies. We’ve seen that engaged employees are your best brand advocates.

As prospects for major companies have technologically advanced capabilities for researching, following and sharing company culture, the HR department is becoming more transparent while working with marketing departments to improve brand image. Eighty-seven percent of organizations cite culture and engagement as one of their top challenges.1

With only 25% of the global workforce feeling highly engaged2, it’s no surprise that job hopping has become the norm. To get it right, the most effective strategies come from the top-down. Employers are starting to empower their teams, holding the team leaders responsible for engagement. Now, you need to give them the right tools to do that!

Consider finding out where you are right now by implementing Employee Engagement Surveys. But be mindful that while 64 percent of organizations only measure employee engagement annually3, you should be doing it quarterly at the very least for continuous improvement. Once you level set, look to turn insights into action.

“Learning our language” is the first step of assimilation into company culture. Quicken Loans has a great example of how to help culture thrive with the first step in the door, an unofficial handbook. Just ask us here at Roberts to see our culture-defining guidebook. Although tough to narrow, corporate cultures need to be defined, and recognition should be values-based using those definitions. If you stand for creating powerfully effective work, giving back or plainly giving a damn, then make sure that is the basis for your recognition.

Eighty-one percent of companies are practicing formal recognition programs and the most effective programs are spending 1.5–1.9% of their payroll on recognition4. Sounds like it’s time to step up the recognition game. Recognition opportunities are everywhere you look with standards being Year of Service (YOS) anniversaries, birthdays, holidays or for consistently giving a damn. Effective social media strategies provoke emotion. Pair that with your employee, and you’ve got some good employer branding content.

It’s really a snowball effect allowing employee engagement to become a solid marketing investment. The more you invest in your employees, the happier and more productive they become.5 This builds office loyalty, transforming them into internal (and external) brand ambassadors. Once they are established, you can tap them for success stories, leadership role highlights, speaking events and maybe even alumni relations. Remember, in HR, you’re running the long game.

While traditionally you think of employer branding as an external marketing effort, the most organic, effective ways to secure a solid culture reputation is from within. Throughout each internal touch point, you should be generating social assets, dynamic photos, touting community service and consistently listening to the boots on the ground. Your employees can become your marketable opportunities.

  1. Culture and engagement: The naked organization, Deloitte University Press, 2015
  2. Aon Hewitt 2016 Trends in Global Employee Engagement
  3. Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends 2016
  4. SHRM/Globoforce Survey 2015 Employee Recognition Report
  5. SBA Workplace Index 2016

 

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *