Get inside the head of your Medicare audience

Get inside the head of a 65-year-old

If you are a marketer, you have probably watched as your agency presented their latest creative work and thought, “I don’t get it, this just isn’t doing it for me.”  My reaction, “Perfect!”  If you are not my audience, your reactions have less significance.  If I’m targeting a 65-year-old for Medicare, I would expect your response to be different.  “A 30-year-old mind processes the contents of a commercial, print ad or direct mail piece markedly different from how a 60-year-old mind processed the same information.”  Baby Boomer Marketing & Senior Marketing, Coming of Age Incorporated

Before you can evoke a response out of your audience, you must truly understand the world from their point of view.  It’s hard to comprehend the volume of Medicare messages this audience sees and hears each day or have the same concerns they do about finding affordable health care on a fixed budget.  This generation has been exposed to cut throat marketing pitches for years and is not looking for another person to sell them something.  I am not suggesting you create another series of happy ads with pictures of overly youthful seniors smiling while playing tennis or riding bikes.

This audience doesn’t want a promise of eternal youth or to hear you tell them about your great product, they are purely seeking the facts.  Part A, B, D, etc.–Medicare is a confusing product coupled with the greater uncertainty of  health care reform.  This audience is seeking a trustworthy resource to educate them on the differences among products so they feel empowered to make the best choice. The promise of information and knowledge is much more successful than a self-fulfilling message about how wonderful your products are.

As with any campaign, the key is the perception of your target audience.  To reach your customer, you must first think the way they do, be aware of their fears and motivators, and understand their reactions to a message–which likely vary from your own.  Regardless of your current age, you need to get inside the head of a 65-year-old before you can truly comprehend what messages will motivate them.

 

 

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Get inside the head of your Medicare audience

Get inside the head of a 65-year-old

If you are a marketer, you have probably watched as your agency presented their latest creative work and thought, “I don’t get it, this just isn’t doing it for me.”  My reaction, “Perfect!”  If you are not my audience, your reactions have less significance.  If I’m targeting a 65-year-old for Medicare, I would expect your response to be different.  “A 30-year-old mind processes the contents of a commercial, print ad or direct mail piece markedly different from how a 60-year-old mind processed the same information.”  Baby Boomer Marketing & Senior Marketing, Coming of Age Incorporated

Before you can evoke a response out of your audience, you must truly understand the world from their point of view.  It’s hard to comprehend the volume of Medicare messages this audience sees and hears each day or have the same concerns they do about finding affordable health care on a fixed budget.  This generation has been exposed to cut throat marketing pitches for years and is not looking for another person to sell them something.  I am not suggesting you create another series of happy ads with pictures of overly youthful seniors smiling while playing tennis or riding bikes.

This audience doesn’t want a promise of eternal youth or to hear you tell them about your great product, they are purely seeking the facts.  Part A, B, D, etc.–Medicare is a confusing product coupled with the greater uncertainty of  health care reform.  This audience is seeking a trustworthy resource to educate them on the differences among products so they feel empowered to make the best choice. The promise of information and knowledge is much more successful than a self-fulfilling message about how wonderful your products are.

As with any campaign, the key is the perception of your target audience.  To reach your customer, you must first think the way they do, be aware of their fears and motivators, and understand their reactions to a message–which likely vary from your own.  Regardless of your current age, you need to get inside the head of a 65-year-old before you can truly comprehend what messages will motivate them.

 

 

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How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

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Get inside the head of your Medicare audience

Get inside the head of a 65-year-old

If you are a marketer, you have probably watched as your agency presented their latest creative work and thought, “I don’t get it, this just isn’t doing it for me.”  My reaction, “Perfect!”  If you are not my audience, your reactions have less significance.  If I’m targeting a 65-year-old for Medicare, I would expect your response to be different.  “A 30-year-old mind processes the contents of a commercial, print ad or direct mail piece markedly different from how a 60-year-old mind processed the same information.”  Baby Boomer Marketing & Senior Marketing, Coming of Age Incorporated

Before you can evoke a response out of your audience, you must truly understand the world from their point of view.  It’s hard to comprehend the volume of Medicare messages this audience sees and hears each day or have the same concerns they do about finding affordable health care on a fixed budget.  This generation has been exposed to cut throat marketing pitches for years and is not looking for another person to sell them something.  I am not suggesting you create another series of happy ads with pictures of overly youthful seniors smiling while playing tennis or riding bikes.

This audience doesn’t want a promise of eternal youth or to hear you tell them about your great product, they are purely seeking the facts.  Part A, B, D, etc.–Medicare is a confusing product coupled with the greater uncertainty of  health care reform.  This audience is seeking a trustworthy resource to educate them on the differences among products so they feel empowered to make the best choice. The promise of information and knowledge is much more successful than a self-fulfilling message about how wonderful your products are.

As with any campaign, the key is the perception of your target audience.  To reach your customer, you must first think the way they do, be aware of their fears and motivators, and understand their reactions to a message–which likely vary from your own.  Regardless of your current age, you need to get inside the head of a 65-year-old before you can truly comprehend what messages will motivate them.

 

 

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How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get inside the head of your Medicare audience

Get inside the head of a 65-year-old

If you are a marketer, you have probably watched as your agency presented their latest creative work and thought, “I don’t get it, this just isn’t doing it for me.”  My reaction, “Perfect!”  If you are not my audience, your reactions have less significance.  If I’m targeting a 65-year-old for Medicare, I would expect your response to be different.  “A 30-year-old mind processes the contents of a commercial, print ad or direct mail piece markedly different from how a 60-year-old mind processed the same information.”  Baby Boomer Marketing & Senior Marketing, Coming of Age Incorporated

Before you can evoke a response out of your audience, you must truly understand the world from their point of view.  It’s hard to comprehend the volume of Medicare messages this audience sees and hears each day or have the same concerns they do about finding affordable health care on a fixed budget.  This generation has been exposed to cut throat marketing pitches for years and is not looking for another person to sell them something.  I am not suggesting you create another series of happy ads with pictures of overly youthful seniors smiling while playing tennis or riding bikes.

This audience doesn’t want a promise of eternal youth or to hear you tell them about your great product, they are purely seeking the facts.  Part A, B, D, etc.–Medicare is a confusing product coupled with the greater uncertainty of  health care reform.  This audience is seeking a trustworthy resource to educate them on the differences among products so they feel empowered to make the best choice. The promise of information and knowledge is much more successful than a self-fulfilling message about how wonderful your products are.

As with any campaign, the key is the perception of your target audience.  To reach your customer, you must first think the way they do, be aware of their fears and motivators, and understand their reactions to a message–which likely vary from your own.  Regardless of your current age, you need to get inside the head of a 65-year-old before you can truly comprehend what messages will motivate them.

 

 

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How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get inside the head of your Medicare audience

Get inside the head of a 65-year-old

If you are a marketer, you have probably watched as your agency presented their latest creative work and thought, “I don’t get it, this just isn’t doing it for me.”  My reaction, “Perfect!”  If you are not my audience, your reactions have less significance.  If I’m targeting a 65-year-old for Medicare, I would expect your response to be different.  “A 30-year-old mind processes the contents of a commercial, print ad or direct mail piece markedly different from how a 60-year-old mind processed the same information.”  Baby Boomer Marketing & Senior Marketing, Coming of Age Incorporated

Before you can evoke a response out of your audience, you must truly understand the world from their point of view.  It’s hard to comprehend the volume of Medicare messages this audience sees and hears each day or have the same concerns they do about finding affordable health care on a fixed budget.  This generation has been exposed to cut throat marketing pitches for years and is not looking for another person to sell them something.  I am not suggesting you create another series of happy ads with pictures of overly youthful seniors smiling while playing tennis or riding bikes.

This audience doesn’t want a promise of eternal youth or to hear you tell them about your great product, they are purely seeking the facts.  Part A, B, D, etc.–Medicare is a confusing product coupled with the greater uncertainty of  health care reform.  This audience is seeking a trustworthy resource to educate them on the differences among products so they feel empowered to make the best choice. The promise of information and knowledge is much more successful than a self-fulfilling message about how wonderful your products are.

As with any campaign, the key is the perception of your target audience.  To reach your customer, you must first think the way they do, be aware of their fears and motivators, and understand their reactions to a message–which likely vary from your own.  Regardless of your current age, you need to get inside the head of a 65-year-old before you can truly comprehend what messages will motivate them.

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get inside the head of your Medicare audience

Get inside the head of a 65-year-old

If you are a marketer, you have probably watched as your agency presented their latest creative work and thought, “I don’t get it, this just isn’t doing it for me.”  My reaction, “Perfect!”  If you are not my audience, your reactions have less significance.  If I’m targeting a 65-year-old for Medicare, I would expect your response to be different.  “A 30-year-old mind processes the contents of a commercial, print ad or direct mail piece markedly different from how a 60-year-old mind processed the same information.”  Baby Boomer Marketing & Senior Marketing, Coming of Age Incorporated

Before you can evoke a response out of your audience, you must truly understand the world from their point of view.  It’s hard to comprehend the volume of Medicare messages this audience sees and hears each day or have the same concerns they do about finding affordable health care on a fixed budget.  This generation has been exposed to cut throat marketing pitches for years and is not looking for another person to sell them something.  I am not suggesting you create another series of happy ads with pictures of overly youthful seniors smiling while playing tennis or riding bikes.

This audience doesn’t want a promise of eternal youth or to hear you tell them about your great product, they are purely seeking the facts.  Part A, B, D, etc.–Medicare is a confusing product coupled with the greater uncertainty of  health care reform.  This audience is seeking a trustworthy resource to educate them on the differences among products so they feel empowered to make the best choice. The promise of information and knowledge is much more successful than a self-fulfilling message about how wonderful your products are.

As with any campaign, the key is the perception of your target audience.  To reach your customer, you must first think the way they do, be aware of their fears and motivators, and understand their reactions to a message–which likely vary from your own.  Regardless of your current age, you need to get inside the head of a 65-year-old before you can truly comprehend what messages will motivate them.

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get inside the head of your Medicare audience

Get inside the head of a 65-year-old

If you are a marketer, you have probably watched as your agency presented their latest creative work and thought, “I don’t get it, this just isn’t doing it for me.”  My reaction, “Perfect!”  If you are not my audience, your reactions have less significance.  If I’m targeting a 65-year-old for Medicare, I would expect your response to be different.  “A 30-year-old mind processes the contents of a commercial, print ad or direct mail piece markedly different from how a 60-year-old mind processed the same information.”  Baby Boomer Marketing & Senior Marketing, Coming of Age Incorporated

Before you can evoke a response out of your audience, you must truly understand the world from their point of view.  It’s hard to comprehend the volume of Medicare messages this audience sees and hears each day or have the same concerns they do about finding affordable health care on a fixed budget.  This generation has been exposed to cut throat marketing pitches for years and is not looking for another person to sell them something.  I am not suggesting you create another series of happy ads with pictures of overly youthful seniors smiling while playing tennis or riding bikes.

This audience doesn’t want a promise of eternal youth or to hear you tell them about your great product, they are purely seeking the facts.  Part A, B, D, etc.–Medicare is a confusing product coupled with the greater uncertainty of  health care reform.  This audience is seeking a trustworthy resource to educate them on the differences among products so they feel empowered to make the best choice. The promise of information and knowledge is much more successful than a self-fulfilling message about how wonderful your products are.

As with any campaign, the key is the perception of your target audience.  To reach your customer, you must first think the way they do, be aware of their fears and motivators, and understand their reactions to a message–which likely vary from your own.  Regardless of your current age, you need to get inside the head of a 65-year-old before you can truly comprehend what messages will motivate them.

 

 

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There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

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