Head-to-toe wearable tech: Can you turn yourself into a healthy robot?

176953930---rowbotOkay, not quite a robot. But that’s not far off. Tech companies are pushing the limits of what we wear, and it’s changing the way we live, especially when it comes to our health. A friend of mine is an early adopter of the Apple Watch. And now he’s always checking how many calories he’s burned and making sure he reaches his goal every day—even if that means doing jumping jacks and sit-ups right before bed. I, on the other hand, prefer a bowl of ice cream before I go to bed. But I digress.

For people living with chronic conditions, the right wearable tech devices could help them positively manage their conditions. And for those of us who just want to live healthier, this could be the trainer/nutritionist/motivator we’ve been looking for.

Here is a quick rundown of head-to-toe wearable tech.

Head

The LifeBEAM Smart Helmet monitors the heart rate and caloric expenditure of cyclists. Not a cyclist? The Smart Hat and Smart Visor are for hikers, walkers, and runners and even count your steps. Because LifeBEAM products were originally designed for astronauts and pilots, they record biometric measurements with aerospace accuracy. Now that’s cool.

Wrist

Okay, okay, you’ve heard of the Apple Watch. But it has so many cool benefits that aren’t exactly obvious. In addition to my previous calorie counter example, it also allows you to record your heartbeat and send it to someone. Imagine what this could mean for somebody living with a heart condition. They could easily send a recording of an irregular heartbeat to their doctor. Not to mention when you go for a walk, run, or bike ride and want to record your distance, it’s easier to just wear a smart watch than carry a phone.

Legs

For people suffering from chronic pain like fibromyalgia, sciatica, or osteoarthritis, Quell could give them some relief. Worn around the calf, this leg strap uses nerve stimulation to relieve sufferers’ pain. Even cooler—its pulse adjusts to daytime and nighttime activities.

Feet

Great for runners who are working on their landing form and measuring their steps, Sensoria Fitness’s smart socks are made with sensors placed within the plantar area that work with an ankle device. The running pattern data and technique information then stream to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

Will wearable tech affect healthcare in the future? Discuss below.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Head-to-toe wearable tech: Can you turn yourself into a healthy robot?

176953930---rowbotOkay, not quite a robot. But that’s not far off. Tech companies are pushing the limits of what we wear, and it’s changing the way we live, especially when it comes to our health. A friend of mine is an early adopter of the Apple Watch. And now he’s always checking how many calories he’s burned and making sure he reaches his goal every day—even if that means doing jumping jacks and sit-ups right before bed. I, on the other hand, prefer a bowl of ice cream before I go to bed. But I digress.

For people living with chronic conditions, the right wearable tech devices could help them positively manage their conditions. And for those of us who just want to live healthier, this could be the trainer/nutritionist/motivator we’ve been looking for.

Here is a quick rundown of head-to-toe wearable tech.

Head

The LifeBEAM Smart Helmet monitors the heart rate and caloric expenditure of cyclists. Not a cyclist? The Smart Hat and Smart Visor are for hikers, walkers, and runners and even count your steps. Because LifeBEAM products were originally designed for astronauts and pilots, they record biometric measurements with aerospace accuracy. Now that’s cool.

Wrist

Okay, okay, you’ve heard of the Apple Watch. But it has so many cool benefits that aren’t exactly obvious. In addition to my previous calorie counter example, it also allows you to record your heartbeat and send it to someone. Imagine what this could mean for somebody living with a heart condition. They could easily send a recording of an irregular heartbeat to their doctor. Not to mention when you go for a walk, run, or bike ride and want to record your distance, it’s easier to just wear a smart watch than carry a phone.

Legs

For people suffering from chronic pain like fibromyalgia, sciatica, or osteoarthritis, Quell could give them some relief. Worn around the calf, this leg strap uses nerve stimulation to relieve sufferers’ pain. Even cooler—its pulse adjusts to daytime and nighttime activities.

Feet

Great for runners who are working on their landing form and measuring their steps, Sensoria Fitness’s smart socks are made with sensors placed within the plantar area that work with an ankle device. The running pattern data and technique information then stream to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

Will wearable tech affect healthcare in the future? Discuss below.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Head-to-toe wearable tech: Can you turn yourself into a healthy robot?

176953930---rowbotOkay, not quite a robot. But that’s not far off. Tech companies are pushing the limits of what we wear, and it’s changing the way we live, especially when it comes to our health. A friend of mine is an early adopter of the Apple Watch. And now he’s always checking how many calories he’s burned and making sure he reaches his goal every day—even if that means doing jumping jacks and sit-ups right before bed. I, on the other hand, prefer a bowl of ice cream before I go to bed. But I digress.

For people living with chronic conditions, the right wearable tech devices could help them positively manage their conditions. And for those of us who just want to live healthier, this could be the trainer/nutritionist/motivator we’ve been looking for.

Here is a quick rundown of head-to-toe wearable tech.

Head

The LifeBEAM Smart Helmet monitors the heart rate and caloric expenditure of cyclists. Not a cyclist? The Smart Hat and Smart Visor are for hikers, walkers, and runners and even count your steps. Because LifeBEAM products were originally designed for astronauts and pilots, they record biometric measurements with aerospace accuracy. Now that’s cool.

Wrist

Okay, okay, you’ve heard of the Apple Watch. But it has so many cool benefits that aren’t exactly obvious. In addition to my previous calorie counter example, it also allows you to record your heartbeat and send it to someone. Imagine what this could mean for somebody living with a heart condition. They could easily send a recording of an irregular heartbeat to their doctor. Not to mention when you go for a walk, run, or bike ride and want to record your distance, it’s easier to just wear a smart watch than carry a phone.

Legs

For people suffering from chronic pain like fibromyalgia, sciatica, or osteoarthritis, Quell could give them some relief. Worn around the calf, this leg strap uses nerve stimulation to relieve sufferers’ pain. Even cooler—its pulse adjusts to daytime and nighttime activities.

Feet

Great for runners who are working on their landing form and measuring their steps, Sensoria Fitness’s smart socks are made with sensors placed within the plantar area that work with an ankle device. The running pattern data and technique information then stream to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

Will wearable tech affect healthcare in the future? Discuss below.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Head-to-toe wearable tech: Can you turn yourself into a healthy robot?

176953930---rowbotOkay, not quite a robot. But that’s not far off. Tech companies are pushing the limits of what we wear, and it’s changing the way we live, especially when it comes to our health. A friend of mine is an early adopter of the Apple Watch. And now he’s always checking how many calories he’s burned and making sure he reaches his goal every day—even if that means doing jumping jacks and sit-ups right before bed. I, on the other hand, prefer a bowl of ice cream before I go to bed. But I digress.

For people living with chronic conditions, the right wearable tech devices could help them positively manage their conditions. And for those of us who just want to live healthier, this could be the trainer/nutritionist/motivator we’ve been looking for.

Here is a quick rundown of head-to-toe wearable tech.

Head

The LifeBEAM Smart Helmet monitors the heart rate and caloric expenditure of cyclists. Not a cyclist? The Smart Hat and Smart Visor are for hikers, walkers, and runners and even count your steps. Because LifeBEAM products were originally designed for astronauts and pilots, they record biometric measurements with aerospace accuracy. Now that’s cool.

Wrist

Okay, okay, you’ve heard of the Apple Watch. But it has so many cool benefits that aren’t exactly obvious. In addition to my previous calorie counter example, it also allows you to record your heartbeat and send it to someone. Imagine what this could mean for somebody living with a heart condition. They could easily send a recording of an irregular heartbeat to their doctor. Not to mention when you go for a walk, run, or bike ride and want to record your distance, it’s easier to just wear a smart watch than carry a phone.

Legs

For people suffering from chronic pain like fibromyalgia, sciatica, or osteoarthritis, Quell could give them some relief. Worn around the calf, this leg strap uses nerve stimulation to relieve sufferers’ pain. Even cooler—its pulse adjusts to daytime and nighttime activities.

Feet

Great for runners who are working on their landing form and measuring their steps, Sensoria Fitness’s smart socks are made with sensors placed within the plantar area that work with an ankle device. The running pattern data and technique information then stream to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

Will wearable tech affect healthcare in the future? Discuss below.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Head-to-toe wearable tech: Can you turn yourself into a healthy robot?

176953930---rowbotOkay, not quite a robot. But that’s not far off. Tech companies are pushing the limits of what we wear, and it’s changing the way we live, especially when it comes to our health. A friend of mine is an early adopter of the Apple Watch. And now he’s always checking how many calories he’s burned and making sure he reaches his goal every day—even if that means doing jumping jacks and sit-ups right before bed. I, on the other hand, prefer a bowl of ice cream before I go to bed. But I digress.

For people living with chronic conditions, the right wearable tech devices could help them positively manage their conditions. And for those of us who just want to live healthier, this could be the trainer/nutritionist/motivator we’ve been looking for.

Here is a quick rundown of head-to-toe wearable tech.

Head

The LifeBEAM Smart Helmet monitors the heart rate and caloric expenditure of cyclists. Not a cyclist? The Smart Hat and Smart Visor are for hikers, walkers, and runners and even count your steps. Because LifeBEAM products were originally designed for astronauts and pilots, they record biometric measurements with aerospace accuracy. Now that’s cool.

Wrist

Okay, okay, you’ve heard of the Apple Watch. But it has so many cool benefits that aren’t exactly obvious. In addition to my previous calorie counter example, it also allows you to record your heartbeat and send it to someone. Imagine what this could mean for somebody living with a heart condition. They could easily send a recording of an irregular heartbeat to their doctor. Not to mention when you go for a walk, run, or bike ride and want to record your distance, it’s easier to just wear a smart watch than carry a phone.

Legs

For people suffering from chronic pain like fibromyalgia, sciatica, or osteoarthritis, Quell could give them some relief. Worn around the calf, this leg strap uses nerve stimulation to relieve sufferers’ pain. Even cooler—its pulse adjusts to daytime and nighttime activities.

Feet

Great for runners who are working on their landing form and measuring their steps, Sensoria Fitness’s smart socks are made with sensors placed within the plantar area that work with an ankle device. The running pattern data and technique information then stream to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

Will wearable tech affect healthcare in the future? Discuss below.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Head-to-toe wearable tech: Can you turn yourself into a healthy robot?

176953930---rowbotOkay, not quite a robot. But that’s not far off. Tech companies are pushing the limits of what we wear, and it’s changing the way we live, especially when it comes to our health. A friend of mine is an early adopter of the Apple Watch. And now he’s always checking how many calories he’s burned and making sure he reaches his goal every day—even if that means doing jumping jacks and sit-ups right before bed. I, on the other hand, prefer a bowl of ice cream before I go to bed. But I digress.

For people living with chronic conditions, the right wearable tech devices could help them positively manage their conditions. And for those of us who just want to live healthier, this could be the trainer/nutritionist/motivator we’ve been looking for.

Here is a quick rundown of head-to-toe wearable tech.

Head

The LifeBEAM Smart Helmet monitors the heart rate and caloric expenditure of cyclists. Not a cyclist? The Smart Hat and Smart Visor are for hikers, walkers, and runners and even count your steps. Because LifeBEAM products were originally designed for astronauts and pilots, they record biometric measurements with aerospace accuracy. Now that’s cool.

Wrist

Okay, okay, you’ve heard of the Apple Watch. But it has so many cool benefits that aren’t exactly obvious. In addition to my previous calorie counter example, it also allows you to record your heartbeat and send it to someone. Imagine what this could mean for somebody living with a heart condition. They could easily send a recording of an irregular heartbeat to their doctor. Not to mention when you go for a walk, run, or bike ride and want to record your distance, it’s easier to just wear a smart watch than carry a phone.

Legs

For people suffering from chronic pain like fibromyalgia, sciatica, or osteoarthritis, Quell could give them some relief. Worn around the calf, this leg strap uses nerve stimulation to relieve sufferers’ pain. Even cooler—its pulse adjusts to daytime and nighttime activities.

Feet

Great for runners who are working on their landing form and measuring their steps, Sensoria Fitness’s smart socks are made with sensors placed within the plantar area that work with an ankle device. The running pattern data and technique information then stream to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

Will wearable tech affect healthcare in the future? Discuss below.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Head-to-toe wearable tech: Can you turn yourself into a healthy robot?

176953930---rowbotOkay, not quite a robot. But that’s not far off. Tech companies are pushing the limits of what we wear, and it’s changing the way we live, especially when it comes to our health. A friend of mine is an early adopter of the Apple Watch. And now he’s always checking how many calories he’s burned and making sure he reaches his goal every day—even if that means doing jumping jacks and sit-ups right before bed. I, on the other hand, prefer a bowl of ice cream before I go to bed. But I digress.

For people living with chronic conditions, the right wearable tech devices could help them positively manage their conditions. And for those of us who just want to live healthier, this could be the trainer/nutritionist/motivator we’ve been looking for.

Here is a quick rundown of head-to-toe wearable tech.

Head

The LifeBEAM Smart Helmet monitors the heart rate and caloric expenditure of cyclists. Not a cyclist? The Smart Hat and Smart Visor are for hikers, walkers, and runners and even count your steps. Because LifeBEAM products were originally designed for astronauts and pilots, they record biometric measurements with aerospace accuracy. Now that’s cool.

Wrist

Okay, okay, you’ve heard of the Apple Watch. But it has so many cool benefits that aren’t exactly obvious. In addition to my previous calorie counter example, it also allows you to record your heartbeat and send it to someone. Imagine what this could mean for somebody living with a heart condition. They could easily send a recording of an irregular heartbeat to their doctor. Not to mention when you go for a walk, run, or bike ride and want to record your distance, it’s easier to just wear a smart watch than carry a phone.

Legs

For people suffering from chronic pain like fibromyalgia, sciatica, or osteoarthritis, Quell could give them some relief. Worn around the calf, this leg strap uses nerve stimulation to relieve sufferers’ pain. Even cooler—its pulse adjusts to daytime and nighttime activities.

Feet

Great for runners who are working on their landing form and measuring their steps, Sensoria Fitness’s smart socks are made with sensors placed within the plantar area that work with an ankle device. The running pattern data and technique information then stream to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

Will wearable tech affect healthcare in the future? Discuss below.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *