How to Connect with Seniors Online?

Seniors Want to be Connected

Creating the connection

Tonight I received an emergency call from a close friend who lives at a nearby senior center. She was desperate to print some airline itineraries and she could not get the printer to work. I immediately summoned my computer programmer husband to her rescue assuming that she needed some serious technical assistance. Although my friend is 88 years old, she is not exactly lacking in technical skills. She Skypes with all her out-of-town children and she communicates with all her grandchildren through Facebook and e-mail. My husband arrives at the senior center only to find that what my friend really wanted was not technical assistance as much as someone to connect with.

It is easy to assume that seniors are not online and that my friend is an exception; but in reality seniors want to be connected to their loved ones. They thrive on being independent. In a day and age where families are spread out across the country, online connections are key for them to stay close to those they love.

Recent stats confirm that seniors want to be connected.

  • Computer use among Americans 65 and older has doubled in the past 10 years, while online usage among that age group has more than tripled, according to the Pew Internet Project.
  • Smartphone ownership has exploded among adults 65+ accounting for 4.4 million users, up 127% from the previous year (Comscore).
  • Adults 55+ are the fastest growing segment in social networking (ComScore).

We tested our theory and set up Facebook and online display media campaigns promoting a client’s Medicare product. We knew that seniors are information hungry for Medicare insights, but would they click on an online ad or interact with a Facebook promotion?

Three points of connection:

  • Seniors like expandable banners that provide more content easily and without too many click-throughs.
  • Facebook is an affordable way to target by age and get an active response. Seniors like advertising that is targeted to them.
  • Keep it informational. Give them something they can share with a loved one.

Our campaign convinced us that online media was not a barrier, but an enabler for seniors. It allows them to quickly access information, and share with others.

Stanford Professor Laura Carstensen, the director of Stanford University’s

Seniors are Connected

Center on Longevity, says that “social networking is proving more and more to be an entrance into technology for older adults.” As independence among seniors starts to decline, more are experiencing social isolation, loneliness and depression, especially those living away from family and in assisted-living homes.

In my friend’s case, she used technology to initiate human interaction, and after all isn’t that what online networking is all about?

 

 

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How can we help you make change?

2 Responses to How to Connect with Seniors Online?
  1. Julia

    cool!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

How to Connect with Seniors Online?

Seniors Want to be Connected

Creating the connection

Tonight I received an emergency call from a close friend who lives at a nearby senior center. She was desperate to print some airline itineraries and she could not get the printer to work. I immediately summoned my computer programmer husband to her rescue assuming that she needed some serious technical assistance. Although my friend is 88 years old, she is not exactly lacking in technical skills. She Skypes with all her out-of-town children and she communicates with all her grandchildren through Facebook and e-mail. My husband arrives at the senior center only to find that what my friend really wanted was not technical assistance as much as someone to connect with.

It is easy to assume that seniors are not online and that my friend is an exception; but in reality seniors want to be connected to their loved ones. They thrive on being independent. In a day and age where families are spread out across the country, online connections are key for them to stay close to those they love.

Recent stats confirm that seniors want to be connected.

  • Computer use among Americans 65 and older has doubled in the past 10 years, while online usage among that age group has more than tripled, according to the Pew Internet Project.
  • Smartphone ownership has exploded among adults 65+ accounting for 4.4 million users, up 127% from the previous year (Comscore).
  • Adults 55+ are the fastest growing segment in social networking (ComScore).

We tested our theory and set up Facebook and online display media campaigns promoting a client’s Medicare product. We knew that seniors are information hungry for Medicare insights, but would they click on an online ad or interact with a Facebook promotion?

Three points of connection:

  • Seniors like expandable banners that provide more content easily and without too many click-throughs.
  • Facebook is an affordable way to target by age and get an active response. Seniors like advertising that is targeted to them.
  • Keep it informational. Give them something they can share with a loved one.

Our campaign convinced us that online media was not a barrier, but an enabler for seniors. It allows them to quickly access information, and share with others.

Stanford Professor Laura Carstensen, the director of Stanford University’s

Seniors are Connected

Center on Longevity, says that “social networking is proving more and more to be an entrance into technology for older adults.” As independence among seniors starts to decline, more are experiencing social isolation, loneliness and depression, especially those living away from family and in assisted-living homes.

In my friend’s case, she used technology to initiate human interaction, and after all isn’t that what online networking is all about?

 

 

Related articles

How can we help you make change?

2 Responses to How to Connect with Seniors Online?
  1. Julia

    cool!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

How to Connect with Seniors Online?

Seniors Want to be Connected

Creating the connection

Tonight I received an emergency call from a close friend who lives at a nearby senior center. She was desperate to print some airline itineraries and she could not get the printer to work. I immediately summoned my computer programmer husband to her rescue assuming that she needed some serious technical assistance. Although my friend is 88 years old, she is not exactly lacking in technical skills. She Skypes with all her out-of-town children and she communicates with all her grandchildren through Facebook and e-mail. My husband arrives at the senior center only to find that what my friend really wanted was not technical assistance as much as someone to connect with.

It is easy to assume that seniors are not online and that my friend is an exception; but in reality seniors want to be connected to their loved ones. They thrive on being independent. In a day and age where families are spread out across the country, online connections are key for them to stay close to those they love.

Recent stats confirm that seniors want to be connected.

  • Computer use among Americans 65 and older has doubled in the past 10 years, while online usage among that age group has more than tripled, according to the Pew Internet Project.
  • Smartphone ownership has exploded among adults 65+ accounting for 4.4 million users, up 127% from the previous year (Comscore).
  • Adults 55+ are the fastest growing segment in social networking (ComScore).

We tested our theory and set up Facebook and online display media campaigns promoting a client’s Medicare product. We knew that seniors are information hungry for Medicare insights, but would they click on an online ad or interact with a Facebook promotion?

Three points of connection:

  • Seniors like expandable banners that provide more content easily and without too many click-throughs.
  • Facebook is an affordable way to target by age and get an active response. Seniors like advertising that is targeted to them.
  • Keep it informational. Give them something they can share with a loved one.

Our campaign convinced us that online media was not a barrier, but an enabler for seniors. It allows them to quickly access information, and share with others.

Stanford Professor Laura Carstensen, the director of Stanford University’s

Seniors are Connected

Center on Longevity, says that “social networking is proving more and more to be an entrance into technology for older adults.” As independence among seniors starts to decline, more are experiencing social isolation, loneliness and depression, especially those living away from family and in assisted-living homes.

In my friend’s case, she used technology to initiate human interaction, and after all isn’t that what online networking is all about?

 

 

Related articles

How can we help you make change?

2 Responses to How to Connect with Seniors Online?
  1. Julia

    cool!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

How to Connect with Seniors Online?

Seniors Want to be Connected

Creating the connection

Tonight I received an emergency call from a close friend who lives at a nearby senior center. She was desperate to print some airline itineraries and she could not get the printer to work. I immediately summoned my computer programmer husband to her rescue assuming that she needed some serious technical assistance. Although my friend is 88 years old, she is not exactly lacking in technical skills. She Skypes with all her out-of-town children and she communicates with all her grandchildren through Facebook and e-mail. My husband arrives at the senior center only to find that what my friend really wanted was not technical assistance as much as someone to connect with.

It is easy to assume that seniors are not online and that my friend is an exception; but in reality seniors want to be connected to their loved ones. They thrive on being independent. In a day and age where families are spread out across the country, online connections are key for them to stay close to those they love.

Recent stats confirm that seniors want to be connected.

  • Computer use among Americans 65 and older has doubled in the past 10 years, while online usage among that age group has more than tripled, according to the Pew Internet Project.
  • Smartphone ownership has exploded among adults 65+ accounting for 4.4 million users, up 127% from the previous year (Comscore).
  • Adults 55+ are the fastest growing segment in social networking (ComScore).

We tested our theory and set up Facebook and online display media campaigns promoting a client’s Medicare product. We knew that seniors are information hungry for Medicare insights, but would they click on an online ad or interact with a Facebook promotion?

Three points of connection:

  • Seniors like expandable banners that provide more content easily and without too many click-throughs.
  • Facebook is an affordable way to target by age and get an active response. Seniors like advertising that is targeted to them.
  • Keep it informational. Give them something they can share with a loved one.

Our campaign convinced us that online media was not a barrier, but an enabler for seniors. It allows them to quickly access information, and share with others.

Stanford Professor Laura Carstensen, the director of Stanford University’s

Seniors are Connected

Center on Longevity, says that “social networking is proving more and more to be an entrance into technology for older adults.” As independence among seniors starts to decline, more are experiencing social isolation, loneliness and depression, especially those living away from family and in assisted-living homes.

In my friend’s case, she used technology to initiate human interaction, and after all isn’t that what online networking is all about?

 

 

Related articles

How can we help you make change?

2 Responses to How to Connect with Seniors Online?
  1. Julia

    cool!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

How to Connect with Seniors Online?

Seniors Want to be Connected

Creating the connection

Tonight I received an emergency call from a close friend who lives at a nearby senior center. She was desperate to print some airline itineraries and she could not get the printer to work. I immediately summoned my computer programmer husband to her rescue assuming that she needed some serious technical assistance. Although my friend is 88 years old, she is not exactly lacking in technical skills. She Skypes with all her out-of-town children and she communicates with all her grandchildren through Facebook and e-mail. My husband arrives at the senior center only to find that what my friend really wanted was not technical assistance as much as someone to connect with.

It is easy to assume that seniors are not online and that my friend is an exception; but in reality seniors want to be connected to their loved ones. They thrive on being independent. In a day and age where families are spread out across the country, online connections are key for them to stay close to those they love.

Recent stats confirm that seniors want to be connected.

  • Computer use among Americans 65 and older has doubled in the past 10 years, while online usage among that age group has more than tripled, according to the Pew Internet Project.
  • Smartphone ownership has exploded among adults 65+ accounting for 4.4 million users, up 127% from the previous year (Comscore).
  • Adults 55+ are the fastest growing segment in social networking (ComScore).

We tested our theory and set up Facebook and online display media campaigns promoting a client’s Medicare product. We knew that seniors are information hungry for Medicare insights, but would they click on an online ad or interact with a Facebook promotion?

Three points of connection:

  • Seniors like expandable banners that provide more content easily and without too many click-throughs.
  • Facebook is an affordable way to target by age and get an active response. Seniors like advertising that is targeted to them.
  • Keep it informational. Give them something they can share with a loved one.

Our campaign convinced us that online media was not a barrier, but an enabler for seniors. It allows them to quickly access information, and share with others.

Stanford Professor Laura Carstensen, the director of Stanford University’s

Seniors are Connected

Center on Longevity, says that “social networking is proving more and more to be an entrance into technology for older adults.” As independence among seniors starts to decline, more are experiencing social isolation, loneliness and depression, especially those living away from family and in assisted-living homes.

In my friend’s case, she used technology to initiate human interaction, and after all isn’t that what online networking is all about?

 

 

Related articles

How can we help you make change?

2 Responses to How to Connect with Seniors Online?
  1. Julia

    cool!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

How to Connect with Seniors Online?

Seniors Want to be Connected

Creating the connection

Tonight I received an emergency call from a close friend who lives at a nearby senior center. She was desperate to print some airline itineraries and she could not get the printer to work. I immediately summoned my computer programmer husband to her rescue assuming that she needed some serious technical assistance. Although my friend is 88 years old, she is not exactly lacking in technical skills. She Skypes with all her out-of-town children and she communicates with all her grandchildren through Facebook and e-mail. My husband arrives at the senior center only to find that what my friend really wanted was not technical assistance as much as someone to connect with.

It is easy to assume that seniors are not online and that my friend is an exception; but in reality seniors want to be connected to their loved ones. They thrive on being independent. In a day and age where families are spread out across the country, online connections are key for them to stay close to those they love.

Recent stats confirm that seniors want to be connected.

  • Computer use among Americans 65 and older has doubled in the past 10 years, while online usage among that age group has more than tripled, according to the Pew Internet Project.
  • Smartphone ownership has exploded among adults 65+ accounting for 4.4 million users, up 127% from the previous year (Comscore).
  • Adults 55+ are the fastest growing segment in social networking (ComScore).

We tested our theory and set up Facebook and online display media campaigns promoting a client’s Medicare product. We knew that seniors are information hungry for Medicare insights, but would they click on an online ad or interact with a Facebook promotion?

Three points of connection:

  • Seniors like expandable banners that provide more content easily and without too many click-throughs.
  • Facebook is an affordable way to target by age and get an active response. Seniors like advertising that is targeted to them.
  • Keep it informational. Give them something they can share with a loved one.

Our campaign convinced us that online media was not a barrier, but an enabler for seniors. It allows them to quickly access information, and share with others.

Stanford Professor Laura Carstensen, the director of Stanford University’s

Seniors are Connected

Center on Longevity, says that “social networking is proving more and more to be an entrance into technology for older adults.” As independence among seniors starts to decline, more are experiencing social isolation, loneliness and depression, especially those living away from family and in assisted-living homes.

In my friend’s case, she used technology to initiate human interaction, and after all isn’t that what online networking is all about?

 

 

Related articles

How can we help you make change?

2 Responses to How to Connect with Seniors Online?
  1. Julia

    cool!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

How to Connect with Seniors Online?

Seniors Want to be Connected

Creating the connection

Tonight I received an emergency call from a close friend who lives at a nearby senior center. She was desperate to print some airline itineraries and she could not get the printer to work. I immediately summoned my computer programmer husband to her rescue assuming that she needed some serious technical assistance. Although my friend is 88 years old, she is not exactly lacking in technical skills. She Skypes with all her out-of-town children and she communicates with all her grandchildren through Facebook and e-mail. My husband arrives at the senior center only to find that what my friend really wanted was not technical assistance as much as someone to connect with.

It is easy to assume that seniors are not online and that my friend is an exception; but in reality seniors want to be connected to their loved ones. They thrive on being independent. In a day and age where families are spread out across the country, online connections are key for them to stay close to those they love.

Recent stats confirm that seniors want to be connected.

  • Computer use among Americans 65 and older has doubled in the past 10 years, while online usage among that age group has more than tripled, according to the Pew Internet Project.
  • Smartphone ownership has exploded among adults 65+ accounting for 4.4 million users, up 127% from the previous year (Comscore).
  • Adults 55+ are the fastest growing segment in social networking (ComScore).

We tested our theory and set up Facebook and online display media campaigns promoting a client’s Medicare product. We knew that seniors are information hungry for Medicare insights, but would they click on an online ad or interact with a Facebook promotion?

Three points of connection:

  • Seniors like expandable banners that provide more content easily and without too many click-throughs.
  • Facebook is an affordable way to target by age and get an active response. Seniors like advertising that is targeted to them.
  • Keep it informational. Give them something they can share with a loved one.

Our campaign convinced us that online media was not a barrier, but an enabler for seniors. It allows them to quickly access information, and share with others.

Stanford Professor Laura Carstensen, the director of Stanford University’s

Seniors are Connected

Center on Longevity, says that “social networking is proving more and more to be an entrance into technology for older adults.” As independence among seniors starts to decline, more are experiencing social isolation, loneliness and depression, especially those living away from family and in assisted-living homes.

In my friend’s case, she used technology to initiate human interaction, and after all isn’t that what online networking is all about?

 

 

Related articles

How can we help you make change?

2 Responses to How to Connect with Seniors Online?
  1. Julia

    cool!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *