Positive Marketing Messages Can Inspire Purchase Decisions

86496084Every consumer is unique. They each have their own goals, passions, concerns, challenges, moods. As a marketer, you typically can’t control any of those factors. But you can control how you communicate with people and guide the impact you hope your communications have.

It feels like the majority of marketing messages out there are meant to touch on the worries and obstacles a consumer or decision maker faces—aiming to remind them of the negative situation or pain point and then present a product or service as the solution.

I won’t argue that there’s no place for this approach. But what about a different take? What if a marketing message made a consumer or decision maker feel good, hopeful, optimistic?

In a Nielsen poll of more than 29,000 internet responders in 58 countries, 47% of respondents agreed that humorous ads resonated the most. Even if that’s not a surprise to you (we all love a good DirecTV spot, after all), let’s talk about how positive messages impact decisions to buy.

Consider consumer confidence—a combination of a person’s perception of both his or her personal financial state as well as the economy. When it’s low, purchasing behaviors drop; when it’s high, retail sales follow suit. This supports the idea that confidence tends to inspire people to buy.

This concept goes beyond humor, of course. It ties into positive psychology and strength-based marketing. It’s about understanding and enabling the strengths that allow individuals and communities to thrive. And it really can work when marketers use their messages, brands and products/services to make an impact and improve people’s lives. It can not only drive purchase decisions but also long-term brand relationships.

Positivity is contagious, too. When you put out a message or piece of content, of course you hope it gets naturally shared among consumers and decision makers. People are much more likely to share positive content.

Conversely, negativity can lead to disconnectedness with customers and prospects. The more negative remarks you make on social media, for example, the fewer followers you’ll get.

Social Media Followers and Negativity

The bottom line is that you don’t always have to scare or challenge your target audience into buying. Happy content can convert, and it’s probably worth exploring and testing in your market.

Has a positive marketing message or piece of content inspired you to make a purchase?

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Positive Marketing Messages Can Inspire Purchase Decisions

86496084Every consumer is unique. They each have their own goals, passions, concerns, challenges, moods. As a marketer, you typically can’t control any of those factors. But you can control how you communicate with people and guide the impact you hope your communications have.

It feels like the majority of marketing messages out there are meant to touch on the worries and obstacles a consumer or decision maker faces—aiming to remind them of the negative situation or pain point and then present a product or service as the solution.

I won’t argue that there’s no place for this approach. But what about a different take? What if a marketing message made a consumer or decision maker feel good, hopeful, optimistic?

In a Nielsen poll of more than 29,000 internet responders in 58 countries, 47% of respondents agreed that humorous ads resonated the most. Even if that’s not a surprise to you (we all love a good DirecTV spot, after all), let’s talk about how positive messages impact decisions to buy.

Consider consumer confidence—a combination of a person’s perception of both his or her personal financial state as well as the economy. When it’s low, purchasing behaviors drop; when it’s high, retail sales follow suit. This supports the idea that confidence tends to inspire people to buy.

This concept goes beyond humor, of course. It ties into positive psychology and strength-based marketing. It’s about understanding and enabling the strengths that allow individuals and communities to thrive. And it really can work when marketers use their messages, brands and products/services to make an impact and improve people’s lives. It can not only drive purchase decisions but also long-term brand relationships.

Positivity is contagious, too. When you put out a message or piece of content, of course you hope it gets naturally shared among consumers and decision makers. People are much more likely to share positive content.

Conversely, negativity can lead to disconnectedness with customers and prospects. The more negative remarks you make on social media, for example, the fewer followers you’ll get.

Social Media Followers and Negativity

The bottom line is that you don’t always have to scare or challenge your target audience into buying. Happy content can convert, and it’s probably worth exploring and testing in your market.

Has a positive marketing message or piece of content inspired you to make a purchase?

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Positive Marketing Messages Can Inspire Purchase Decisions

86496084Every consumer is unique. They each have their own goals, passions, concerns, challenges, moods. As a marketer, you typically can’t control any of those factors. But you can control how you communicate with people and guide the impact you hope your communications have.

It feels like the majority of marketing messages out there are meant to touch on the worries and obstacles a consumer or decision maker faces—aiming to remind them of the negative situation or pain point and then present a product or service as the solution.

I won’t argue that there’s no place for this approach. But what about a different take? What if a marketing message made a consumer or decision maker feel good, hopeful, optimistic?

In a Nielsen poll of more than 29,000 internet responders in 58 countries, 47% of respondents agreed that humorous ads resonated the most. Even if that’s not a surprise to you (we all love a good DirecTV spot, after all), let’s talk about how positive messages impact decisions to buy.

Consider consumer confidence—a combination of a person’s perception of both his or her personal financial state as well as the economy. When it’s low, purchasing behaviors drop; when it’s high, retail sales follow suit. This supports the idea that confidence tends to inspire people to buy.

This concept goes beyond humor, of course. It ties into positive psychology and strength-based marketing. It’s about understanding and enabling the strengths that allow individuals and communities to thrive. And it really can work when marketers use their messages, brands and products/services to make an impact and improve people’s lives. It can not only drive purchase decisions but also long-term brand relationships.

Positivity is contagious, too. When you put out a message or piece of content, of course you hope it gets naturally shared among consumers and decision makers. People are much more likely to share positive content.

Conversely, negativity can lead to disconnectedness with customers and prospects. The more negative remarks you make on social media, for example, the fewer followers you’ll get.

Social Media Followers and Negativity

The bottom line is that you don’t always have to scare or challenge your target audience into buying. Happy content can convert, and it’s probably worth exploring and testing in your market.

Has a positive marketing message or piece of content inspired you to make a purchase?

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Positive Marketing Messages Can Inspire Purchase Decisions

86496084Every consumer is unique. They each have their own goals, passions, concerns, challenges, moods. As a marketer, you typically can’t control any of those factors. But you can control how you communicate with people and guide the impact you hope your communications have.

It feels like the majority of marketing messages out there are meant to touch on the worries and obstacles a consumer or decision maker faces—aiming to remind them of the negative situation or pain point and then present a product or service as the solution.

I won’t argue that there’s no place for this approach. But what about a different take? What if a marketing message made a consumer or decision maker feel good, hopeful, optimistic?

In a Nielsen poll of more than 29,000 internet responders in 58 countries, 47% of respondents agreed that humorous ads resonated the most. Even if that’s not a surprise to you (we all love a good DirecTV spot, after all), let’s talk about how positive messages impact decisions to buy.

Consider consumer confidence—a combination of a person’s perception of both his or her personal financial state as well as the economy. When it’s low, purchasing behaviors drop; when it’s high, retail sales follow suit. This supports the idea that confidence tends to inspire people to buy.

This concept goes beyond humor, of course. It ties into positive psychology and strength-based marketing. It’s about understanding and enabling the strengths that allow individuals and communities to thrive. And it really can work when marketers use their messages, brands and products/services to make an impact and improve people’s lives. It can not only drive purchase decisions but also long-term brand relationships.

Positivity is contagious, too. When you put out a message or piece of content, of course you hope it gets naturally shared among consumers and decision makers. People are much more likely to share positive content.

Conversely, negativity can lead to disconnectedness with customers and prospects. The more negative remarks you make on social media, for example, the fewer followers you’ll get.

Social Media Followers and Negativity

The bottom line is that you don’t always have to scare or challenge your target audience into buying. Happy content can convert, and it’s probably worth exploring and testing in your market.

Has a positive marketing message or piece of content inspired you to make a purchase?

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *