Reach the C-suite? Learn to swim with whales.

Weekly Blog0Before you jump in and join the throngs of marketers searching to connect with C-levels, you need to do your homework first.

Reaching the elusive audience known as the C-suite is one of the most sought after, targeted audiences in the business world—every business, salesperson, thought leader, content marketer, and subject matter expert wants something from the C-suite: attention, resources, approval, buy-in, mind share, and of course, budget.

The C-suite today is a very different story than just even a few years ago. No longer can you find them all hanging out at the same clubs, restaurants, trade events, and analyst meetings like some homogenous pod of prospects. Like each of us, their interests, media habits, and buyer’s journeys have become more personalized, verticalized, and one-to-one. And, of course, social.
building @6x

There are more C-levels than ever before.

You’ll need to sharpen your definition and fine-tune your aim before targeting the C-suite. We all know the CEO, CFO, CIO, and CMO titles. But there’s been a sea change of new titles, job requirements, specialization, and innovation that’s led to a proliferation of titles. A quick Google query on the “number of C-level titles” yields a daunting 7,210,000 results in 1.03 seconds. The list below includes some of the familiar C-level job titles and a host of new monikers that range from the tried and true along with some wildly new ones that Jenna Goudreau at Forbes called out in her article entitled “C is for Silly”.

C-levels follow a redefined buyer’s journey.

So along with more C-level titles and positons than ever before—reaching them has gotten more complicated, too. Not only are they harder to locate and connect with—some days it almost seems that there’s a corresponding number of content outlets, publishing platforms, and social channels dedicated to connecting with the “C”-people in our business lives. Tracking conversations (and conversions) with C-levels still follows an articulated buyer’s journey but takes a different path than the traditional sales consideration funnel. To get connected to C-people execs, you need to begin the journey with a “visioning stage” driven by highly pertinent content and open-ended strategy questions to uncover the big gaps, the unmet needs in the marketplace, and a forward focus that helps define a vison-based need.

Vision

What’s the value and why connect with the top?

Major brands and major company decisions need C-level advocacy to succeed and get socialized throughout the board and enterprise stakeholders.

C-level selling is a “brand sale.” What’s brand sale? Any customer-facing decision that will affect stock prices, major capital expenditures, key users, major changes in processes or channels, stakeholders, value chain partners.

BAU probably doesn’t need a C-level advocate—but something like changing a core technology or outsourcing a primary process that interfaces with customers, channels, and employees certainly will need C-level support across the C-suite.

Once you reach the top, your job’s just begun.

Don’t assume that just because you’ve connected with the top tier of an organization that your work is complete. Most senior executives also rely on teams and build consensus with a trusted group of internal advisors, fellow board members, exec teams, department heads, etc. before making a “brand sale” decision. How your market messages and content connects and reverberates inside C-suite echo chamber can matter as much as having the ear of the highest C-level exec. There’s a high level of trust amongst a senior manager team—so hearing “confirming” support and advocacy—even strong countervailing opinions—from others on the team help the CEO feel more assured and confident that the ultimate decision has been fully vetted.

In fact, assuming and acting like you’ve got the ear and attention of the top level exec without connecting with the entire C-suite ecosystems could easily doom your initiative.

Sell the whole C-suite.

It’s a good idea to include other C-suite execs and influencers in your touchpoint plans and outreach. And your messages to them must be unique to resonate with their pain points and business issues. And each will have very different needs and value propositions.

For example, take a CIO, you might pitch her via an ongoing drip campaign and some thought leadership content about a new technology platform for the entire enterprise. She gets the idea and concept, sees the value in your offering, and it’s something she’s been thinking about since the last tech team planning meeting.

That said, she has other concerns and won’t decide until she hears from the whole team. They each have special interests. The network admin is most concerned about how your new platform will sit on his network. Will it help, interfere and integrate with his network? That’s what he wants to hear about. Meanwhile, the VP head of sales wants to know how it will help his sales team’s process and CRM, and is also concerned about a seamless launch that won’t disrupt his customer sales cycle and revenue stream. And so it goes throughout every key voice in the C-level ecosystem. It’s not a one thing done well, but multiple conversations, tracks, and threads.

We’ve pulled some of the best thinking and our collective knowledge around reaching the C-suite together in our new eBook. Check out our free download What Makes the C-suite TickAnd learn more about how to create profitable conversations with high-profile decision-makers.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Reach the C-suite? Learn to swim with whales.

Weekly Blog0Before you jump in and join the throngs of marketers searching to connect with C-levels, you need to do your homework first.

Reaching the elusive audience known as the C-suite is one of the most sought after, targeted audiences in the business world—every business, salesperson, thought leader, content marketer, and subject matter expert wants something from the C-suite: attention, resources, approval, buy-in, mind share, and of course, budget.

The C-suite today is a very different story than just even a few years ago. No longer can you find them all hanging out at the same clubs, restaurants, trade events, and analyst meetings like some homogenous pod of prospects. Like each of us, their interests, media habits, and buyer’s journeys have become more personalized, verticalized, and one-to-one. And, of course, social.
building @6x

There are more C-levels than ever before.

You’ll need to sharpen your definition and fine-tune your aim before targeting the C-suite. We all know the CEO, CFO, CIO, and CMO titles. But there’s been a sea change of new titles, job requirements, specialization, and innovation that’s led to a proliferation of titles. A quick Google query on the “number of C-level titles” yields a daunting 7,210,000 results in 1.03 seconds. The list below includes some of the familiar C-level job titles and a host of new monikers that range from the tried and true along with some wildly new ones that Jenna Goudreau at Forbes called out in her article entitled “C is for Silly”.

C-levels follow a redefined buyer’s journey.

So along with more C-level titles and positons than ever before—reaching them has gotten more complicated, too. Not only are they harder to locate and connect with—some days it almost seems that there’s a corresponding number of content outlets, publishing platforms, and social channels dedicated to connecting with the “C”-people in our business lives. Tracking conversations (and conversions) with C-levels still follows an articulated buyer’s journey but takes a different path than the traditional sales consideration funnel. To get connected to C-people execs, you need to begin the journey with a “visioning stage” driven by highly pertinent content and open-ended strategy questions to uncover the big gaps, the unmet needs in the marketplace, and a forward focus that helps define a vison-based need.

Vision

What’s the value and why connect with the top?

Major brands and major company decisions need C-level advocacy to succeed and get socialized throughout the board and enterprise stakeholders.

C-level selling is a “brand sale.” What’s brand sale? Any customer-facing decision that will affect stock prices, major capital expenditures, key users, major changes in processes or channels, stakeholders, value chain partners.

BAU probably doesn’t need a C-level advocate—but something like changing a core technology or outsourcing a primary process that interfaces with customers, channels, and employees certainly will need C-level support across the C-suite.

Once you reach the top, your job’s just begun.

Don’t assume that just because you’ve connected with the top tier of an organization that your work is complete. Most senior executives also rely on teams and build consensus with a trusted group of internal advisors, fellow board members, exec teams, department heads, etc. before making a “brand sale” decision. How your market messages and content connects and reverberates inside C-suite echo chamber can matter as much as having the ear of the highest C-level exec. There’s a high level of trust amongst a senior manager team—so hearing “confirming” support and advocacy—even strong countervailing opinions—from others on the team help the CEO feel more assured and confident that the ultimate decision has been fully vetted.

In fact, assuming and acting like you’ve got the ear and attention of the top level exec without connecting with the entire C-suite ecosystems could easily doom your initiative.

Sell the whole C-suite.

It’s a good idea to include other C-suite execs and influencers in your touchpoint plans and outreach. And your messages to them must be unique to resonate with their pain points and business issues. And each will have very different needs and value propositions.

For example, take a CIO, you might pitch her via an ongoing drip campaign and some thought leadership content about a new technology platform for the entire enterprise. She gets the idea and concept, sees the value in your offering, and it’s something she’s been thinking about since the last tech team planning meeting.

That said, she has other concerns and won’t decide until she hears from the whole team. They each have special interests. The network admin is most concerned about how your new platform will sit on his network. Will it help, interfere and integrate with his network? That’s what he wants to hear about. Meanwhile, the VP head of sales wants to know how it will help his sales team’s process and CRM, and is also concerned about a seamless launch that won’t disrupt his customer sales cycle and revenue stream. And so it goes throughout every key voice in the C-level ecosystem. It’s not a one thing done well, but multiple conversations, tracks, and threads.

We’ve pulled some of the best thinking and our collective knowledge around reaching the C-suite together in our new eBook. Check out our free download What Makes the C-suite TickAnd learn more about how to create profitable conversations with high-profile decision-makers.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Reach the C-suite? Learn to swim with whales.

Weekly Blog0Before you jump in and join the throngs of marketers searching to connect with C-levels, you need to do your homework first.

Reaching the elusive audience known as the C-suite is one of the most sought after, targeted audiences in the business world—every business, salesperson, thought leader, content marketer, and subject matter expert wants something from the C-suite: attention, resources, approval, buy-in, mind share, and of course, budget.

The C-suite today is a very different story than just even a few years ago. No longer can you find them all hanging out at the same clubs, restaurants, trade events, and analyst meetings like some homogenous pod of prospects. Like each of us, their interests, media habits, and buyer’s journeys have become more personalized, verticalized, and one-to-one. And, of course, social.
building @6x

There are more C-levels than ever before.

You’ll need to sharpen your definition and fine-tune your aim before targeting the C-suite. We all know the CEO, CFO, CIO, and CMO titles. But there’s been a sea change of new titles, job requirements, specialization, and innovation that’s led to a proliferation of titles. A quick Google query on the “number of C-level titles” yields a daunting 7,210,000 results in 1.03 seconds. The list below includes some of the familiar C-level job titles and a host of new monikers that range from the tried and true along with some wildly new ones that Jenna Goudreau at Forbes called out in her article entitled “C is for Silly”.

C-levels follow a redefined buyer’s journey.

So along with more C-level titles and positons than ever before—reaching them has gotten more complicated, too. Not only are they harder to locate and connect with—some days it almost seems that there’s a corresponding number of content outlets, publishing platforms, and social channels dedicated to connecting with the “C”-people in our business lives. Tracking conversations (and conversions) with C-levels still follows an articulated buyer’s journey but takes a different path than the traditional sales consideration funnel. To get connected to C-people execs, you need to begin the journey with a “visioning stage” driven by highly pertinent content and open-ended strategy questions to uncover the big gaps, the unmet needs in the marketplace, and a forward focus that helps define a vison-based need.

Vision

What’s the value and why connect with the top?

Major brands and major company decisions need C-level advocacy to succeed and get socialized throughout the board and enterprise stakeholders.

C-level selling is a “brand sale.” What’s brand sale? Any customer-facing decision that will affect stock prices, major capital expenditures, key users, major changes in processes or channels, stakeholders, value chain partners.

BAU probably doesn’t need a C-level advocate—but something like changing a core technology or outsourcing a primary process that interfaces with customers, channels, and employees certainly will need C-level support across the C-suite.

Once you reach the top, your job’s just begun.

Don’t assume that just because you’ve connected with the top tier of an organization that your work is complete. Most senior executives also rely on teams and build consensus with a trusted group of internal advisors, fellow board members, exec teams, department heads, etc. before making a “brand sale” decision. How your market messages and content connects and reverberates inside C-suite echo chamber can matter as much as having the ear of the highest C-level exec. There’s a high level of trust amongst a senior manager team—so hearing “confirming” support and advocacy—even strong countervailing opinions—from others on the team help the CEO feel more assured and confident that the ultimate decision has been fully vetted.

In fact, assuming and acting like you’ve got the ear and attention of the top level exec without connecting with the entire C-suite ecosystems could easily doom your initiative.

Sell the whole C-suite.

It’s a good idea to include other C-suite execs and influencers in your touchpoint plans and outreach. And your messages to them must be unique to resonate with their pain points and business issues. And each will have very different needs and value propositions.

For example, take a CIO, you might pitch her via an ongoing drip campaign and some thought leadership content about a new technology platform for the entire enterprise. She gets the idea and concept, sees the value in your offering, and it’s something she’s been thinking about since the last tech team planning meeting.

That said, she has other concerns and won’t decide until she hears from the whole team. They each have special interests. The network admin is most concerned about how your new platform will sit on his network. Will it help, interfere and integrate with his network? That’s what he wants to hear about. Meanwhile, the VP head of sales wants to know how it will help his sales team’s process and CRM, and is also concerned about a seamless launch that won’t disrupt his customer sales cycle and revenue stream. And so it goes throughout every key voice in the C-level ecosystem. It’s not a one thing done well, but multiple conversations, tracks, and threads.

We’ve pulled some of the best thinking and our collective knowledge around reaching the C-suite together in our new eBook. Check out our free download What Makes the C-suite TickAnd learn more about how to create profitable conversations with high-profile decision-makers.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Reach the C-suite? Learn to swim with whales.

Weekly Blog0Before you jump in and join the throngs of marketers searching to connect with C-levels, you need to do your homework first.

Reaching the elusive audience known as the C-suite is one of the most sought after, targeted audiences in the business world—every business, salesperson, thought leader, content marketer, and subject matter expert wants something from the C-suite: attention, resources, approval, buy-in, mind share, and of course, budget.

The C-suite today is a very different story than just even a few years ago. No longer can you find them all hanging out at the same clubs, restaurants, trade events, and analyst meetings like some homogenous pod of prospects. Like each of us, their interests, media habits, and buyer’s journeys have become more personalized, verticalized, and one-to-one. And, of course, social.
building @6x

There are more C-levels than ever before.

You’ll need to sharpen your definition and fine-tune your aim before targeting the C-suite. We all know the CEO, CFO, CIO, and CMO titles. But there’s been a sea change of new titles, job requirements, specialization, and innovation that’s led to a proliferation of titles. A quick Google query on the “number of C-level titles” yields a daunting 7,210,000 results in 1.03 seconds. The list below includes some of the familiar C-level job titles and a host of new monikers that range from the tried and true along with some wildly new ones that Jenna Goudreau at Forbes called out in her article entitled “C is for Silly”.

C-levels follow a redefined buyer’s journey.

So along with more C-level titles and positons than ever before—reaching them has gotten more complicated, too. Not only are they harder to locate and connect with—some days it almost seems that there’s a corresponding number of content outlets, publishing platforms, and social channels dedicated to connecting with the “C”-people in our business lives. Tracking conversations (and conversions) with C-levels still follows an articulated buyer’s journey but takes a different path than the traditional sales consideration funnel. To get connected to C-people execs, you need to begin the journey with a “visioning stage” driven by highly pertinent content and open-ended strategy questions to uncover the big gaps, the unmet needs in the marketplace, and a forward focus that helps define a vison-based need.

Vision

What’s the value and why connect with the top?

Major brands and major company decisions need C-level advocacy to succeed and get socialized throughout the board and enterprise stakeholders.

C-level selling is a “brand sale.” What’s brand sale? Any customer-facing decision that will affect stock prices, major capital expenditures, key users, major changes in processes or channels, stakeholders, value chain partners.

BAU probably doesn’t need a C-level advocate—but something like changing a core technology or outsourcing a primary process that interfaces with customers, channels, and employees certainly will need C-level support across the C-suite.

Once you reach the top, your job’s just begun.

Don’t assume that just because you’ve connected with the top tier of an organization that your work is complete. Most senior executives also rely on teams and build consensus with a trusted group of internal advisors, fellow board members, exec teams, department heads, etc. before making a “brand sale” decision. How your market messages and content connects and reverberates inside C-suite echo chamber can matter as much as having the ear of the highest C-level exec. There’s a high level of trust amongst a senior manager team—so hearing “confirming” support and advocacy—even strong countervailing opinions—from others on the team help the CEO feel more assured and confident that the ultimate decision has been fully vetted.

In fact, assuming and acting like you’ve got the ear and attention of the top level exec without connecting with the entire C-suite ecosystems could easily doom your initiative.

Sell the whole C-suite.

It’s a good idea to include other C-suite execs and influencers in your touchpoint plans and outreach. And your messages to them must be unique to resonate with their pain points and business issues. And each will have very different needs and value propositions.

For example, take a CIO, you might pitch her via an ongoing drip campaign and some thought leadership content about a new technology platform for the entire enterprise. She gets the idea and concept, sees the value in your offering, and it’s something she’s been thinking about since the last tech team planning meeting.

That said, she has other concerns and won’t decide until she hears from the whole team. They each have special interests. The network admin is most concerned about how your new platform will sit on his network. Will it help, interfere and integrate with his network? That’s what he wants to hear about. Meanwhile, the VP head of sales wants to know how it will help his sales team’s process and CRM, and is also concerned about a seamless launch that won’t disrupt his customer sales cycle and revenue stream. And so it goes throughout every key voice in the C-level ecosystem. It’s not a one thing done well, but multiple conversations, tracks, and threads.

We’ve pulled some of the best thinking and our collective knowledge around reaching the C-suite together in our new eBook. Check out our free download What Makes the C-suite TickAnd learn more about how to create profitable conversations with high-profile decision-makers.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Reach the C-suite? Learn to swim with whales.

Weekly Blog0Before you jump in and join the throngs of marketers searching to connect with C-levels, you need to do your homework first.

Reaching the elusive audience known as the C-suite is one of the most sought after, targeted audiences in the business world—every business, salesperson, thought leader, content marketer, and subject matter expert wants something from the C-suite: attention, resources, approval, buy-in, mind share, and of course, budget.

The C-suite today is a very different story than just even a few years ago. No longer can you find them all hanging out at the same clubs, restaurants, trade events, and analyst meetings like some homogenous pod of prospects. Like each of us, their interests, media habits, and buyer’s journeys have become more personalized, verticalized, and one-to-one. And, of course, social.
building @6x

There are more C-levels than ever before.

You’ll need to sharpen your definition and fine-tune your aim before targeting the C-suite. We all know the CEO, CFO, CIO, and CMO titles. But there’s been a sea change of new titles, job requirements, specialization, and innovation that’s led to a proliferation of titles. A quick Google query on the “number of C-level titles” yields a daunting 7,210,000 results in 1.03 seconds. The list below includes some of the familiar C-level job titles and a host of new monikers that range from the tried and true along with some wildly new ones that Jenna Goudreau at Forbes called out in her article entitled “C is for Silly”.

C-levels follow a redefined buyer’s journey.

So along with more C-level titles and positons than ever before—reaching them has gotten more complicated, too. Not only are they harder to locate and connect with—some days it almost seems that there’s a corresponding number of content outlets, publishing platforms, and social channels dedicated to connecting with the “C”-people in our business lives. Tracking conversations (and conversions) with C-levels still follows an articulated buyer’s journey but takes a different path than the traditional sales consideration funnel. To get connected to C-people execs, you need to begin the journey with a “visioning stage” driven by highly pertinent content and open-ended strategy questions to uncover the big gaps, the unmet needs in the marketplace, and a forward focus that helps define a vison-based need.

Vision

What’s the value and why connect with the top?

Major brands and major company decisions need C-level advocacy to succeed and get socialized throughout the board and enterprise stakeholders.

C-level selling is a “brand sale.” What’s brand sale? Any customer-facing decision that will affect stock prices, major capital expenditures, key users, major changes in processes or channels, stakeholders, value chain partners.

BAU probably doesn’t need a C-level advocate—but something like changing a core technology or outsourcing a primary process that interfaces with customers, channels, and employees certainly will need C-level support across the C-suite.

Once you reach the top, your job’s just begun.

Don’t assume that just because you’ve connected with the top tier of an organization that your work is complete. Most senior executives also rely on teams and build consensus with a trusted group of internal advisors, fellow board members, exec teams, department heads, etc. before making a “brand sale” decision. How your market messages and content connects and reverberates inside C-suite echo chamber can matter as much as having the ear of the highest C-level exec. There’s a high level of trust amongst a senior manager team—so hearing “confirming” support and advocacy—even strong countervailing opinions—from others on the team help the CEO feel more assured and confident that the ultimate decision has been fully vetted.

In fact, assuming and acting like you’ve got the ear and attention of the top level exec without connecting with the entire C-suite ecosystems could easily doom your initiative.

Sell the whole C-suite.

It’s a good idea to include other C-suite execs and influencers in your touchpoint plans and outreach. And your messages to them must be unique to resonate with their pain points and business issues. And each will have very different needs and value propositions.

For example, take a CIO, you might pitch her via an ongoing drip campaign and some thought leadership content about a new technology platform for the entire enterprise. She gets the idea and concept, sees the value in your offering, and it’s something she’s been thinking about since the last tech team planning meeting.

That said, she has other concerns and won’t decide until she hears from the whole team. They each have special interests. The network admin is most concerned about how your new platform will sit on his network. Will it help, interfere and integrate with his network? That’s what he wants to hear about. Meanwhile, the VP head of sales wants to know how it will help his sales team’s process and CRM, and is also concerned about a seamless launch that won’t disrupt his customer sales cycle and revenue stream. And so it goes throughout every key voice in the C-level ecosystem. It’s not a one thing done well, but multiple conversations, tracks, and threads.

We’ve pulled some of the best thinking and our collective knowledge around reaching the C-suite together in our new eBook. Check out our free download What Makes the C-suite TickAnd learn more about how to create profitable conversations with high-profile decision-makers.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Reach the C-suite? Learn to swim with whales.

Weekly Blog0Before you jump in and join the throngs of marketers searching to connect with C-levels, you need to do your homework first.

Reaching the elusive audience known as the C-suite is one of the most sought after, targeted audiences in the business world—every business, salesperson, thought leader, content marketer, and subject matter expert wants something from the C-suite: attention, resources, approval, buy-in, mind share, and of course, budget.

The C-suite today is a very different story than just even a few years ago. No longer can you find them all hanging out at the same clubs, restaurants, trade events, and analyst meetings like some homogenous pod of prospects. Like each of us, their interests, media habits, and buyer’s journeys have become more personalized, verticalized, and one-to-one. And, of course, social.
building @6x

There are more C-levels than ever before.

You’ll need to sharpen your definition and fine-tune your aim before targeting the C-suite. We all know the CEO, CFO, CIO, and CMO titles. But there’s been a sea change of new titles, job requirements, specialization, and innovation that’s led to a proliferation of titles. A quick Google query on the “number of C-level titles” yields a daunting 7,210,000 results in 1.03 seconds. The list below includes some of the familiar C-level job titles and a host of new monikers that range from the tried and true along with some wildly new ones that Jenna Goudreau at Forbes called out in her article entitled “C is for Silly”.

C-levels follow a redefined buyer’s journey.

So along with more C-level titles and positons than ever before—reaching them has gotten more complicated, too. Not only are they harder to locate and connect with—some days it almost seems that there’s a corresponding number of content outlets, publishing platforms, and social channels dedicated to connecting with the “C”-people in our business lives. Tracking conversations (and conversions) with C-levels still follows an articulated buyer’s journey but takes a different path than the traditional sales consideration funnel. To get connected to C-people execs, you need to begin the journey with a “visioning stage” driven by highly pertinent content and open-ended strategy questions to uncover the big gaps, the unmet needs in the marketplace, and a forward focus that helps define a vison-based need.

Vision

What’s the value and why connect with the top?

Major brands and major company decisions need C-level advocacy to succeed and get socialized throughout the board and enterprise stakeholders.

C-level selling is a “brand sale.” What’s brand sale? Any customer-facing decision that will affect stock prices, major capital expenditures, key users, major changes in processes or channels, stakeholders, value chain partners.

BAU probably doesn’t need a C-level advocate—but something like changing a core technology or outsourcing a primary process that interfaces with customers, channels, and employees certainly will need C-level support across the C-suite.

Once you reach the top, your job’s just begun.

Don’t assume that just because you’ve connected with the top tier of an organization that your work is complete. Most senior executives also rely on teams and build consensus with a trusted group of internal advisors, fellow board members, exec teams, department heads, etc. before making a “brand sale” decision. How your market messages and content connects and reverberates inside C-suite echo chamber can matter as much as having the ear of the highest C-level exec. There’s a high level of trust amongst a senior manager team—so hearing “confirming” support and advocacy—even strong countervailing opinions—from others on the team help the CEO feel more assured and confident that the ultimate decision has been fully vetted.

In fact, assuming and acting like you’ve got the ear and attention of the top level exec without connecting with the entire C-suite ecosystems could easily doom your initiative.

Sell the whole C-suite.

It’s a good idea to include other C-suite execs and influencers in your touchpoint plans and outreach. And your messages to them must be unique to resonate with their pain points and business issues. And each will have very different needs and value propositions.

For example, take a CIO, you might pitch her via an ongoing drip campaign and some thought leadership content about a new technology platform for the entire enterprise. She gets the idea and concept, sees the value in your offering, and it’s something she’s been thinking about since the last tech team planning meeting.

That said, she has other concerns and won’t decide until she hears from the whole team. They each have special interests. The network admin is most concerned about how your new platform will sit on his network. Will it help, interfere and integrate with his network? That’s what he wants to hear about. Meanwhile, the VP head of sales wants to know how it will help his sales team’s process and CRM, and is also concerned about a seamless launch that won’t disrupt his customer sales cycle and revenue stream. And so it goes throughout every key voice in the C-level ecosystem. It’s not a one thing done well, but multiple conversations, tracks, and threads.

We’ve pulled some of the best thinking and our collective knowledge around reaching the C-suite together in our new eBook. Check out our free download What Makes the C-suite TickAnd learn more about how to create profitable conversations with high-profile decision-makers.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Reach the C-suite? Learn to swim with whales.

Weekly Blog0Before you jump in and join the throngs of marketers searching to connect with C-levels, you need to do your homework first.

Reaching the elusive audience known as the C-suite is one of the most sought after, targeted audiences in the business world—every business, salesperson, thought leader, content marketer, and subject matter expert wants something from the C-suite: attention, resources, approval, buy-in, mind share, and of course, budget.

The C-suite today is a very different story than just even a few years ago. No longer can you find them all hanging out at the same clubs, restaurants, trade events, and analyst meetings like some homogenous pod of prospects. Like each of us, their interests, media habits, and buyer’s journeys have become more personalized, verticalized, and one-to-one. And, of course, social.
building @6x

There are more C-levels than ever before.

You’ll need to sharpen your definition and fine-tune your aim before targeting the C-suite. We all know the CEO, CFO, CIO, and CMO titles. But there’s been a sea change of new titles, job requirements, specialization, and innovation that’s led to a proliferation of titles. A quick Google query on the “number of C-level titles” yields a daunting 7,210,000 results in 1.03 seconds. The list below includes some of the familiar C-level job titles and a host of new monikers that range from the tried and true along with some wildly new ones that Jenna Goudreau at Forbes called out in her article entitled “C is for Silly”.

C-levels follow a redefined buyer’s journey.

So along with more C-level titles and positons than ever before—reaching them has gotten more complicated, too. Not only are they harder to locate and connect with—some days it almost seems that there’s a corresponding number of content outlets, publishing platforms, and social channels dedicated to connecting with the “C”-people in our business lives. Tracking conversations (and conversions) with C-levels still follows an articulated buyer’s journey but takes a different path than the traditional sales consideration funnel. To get connected to C-people execs, you need to begin the journey with a “visioning stage” driven by highly pertinent content and open-ended strategy questions to uncover the big gaps, the unmet needs in the marketplace, and a forward focus that helps define a vison-based need.

Vision

What’s the value and why connect with the top?

Major brands and major company decisions need C-level advocacy to succeed and get socialized throughout the board and enterprise stakeholders.

C-level selling is a “brand sale.” What’s brand sale? Any customer-facing decision that will affect stock prices, major capital expenditures, key users, major changes in processes or channels, stakeholders, value chain partners.

BAU probably doesn’t need a C-level advocate—but something like changing a core technology or outsourcing a primary process that interfaces with customers, channels, and employees certainly will need C-level support across the C-suite.

Once you reach the top, your job’s just begun.

Don’t assume that just because you’ve connected with the top tier of an organization that your work is complete. Most senior executives also rely on teams and build consensus with a trusted group of internal advisors, fellow board members, exec teams, department heads, etc. before making a “brand sale” decision. How your market messages and content connects and reverberates inside C-suite echo chamber can matter as much as having the ear of the highest C-level exec. There’s a high level of trust amongst a senior manager team—so hearing “confirming” support and advocacy—even strong countervailing opinions—from others on the team help the CEO feel more assured and confident that the ultimate decision has been fully vetted.

In fact, assuming and acting like you’ve got the ear and attention of the top level exec without connecting with the entire C-suite ecosystems could easily doom your initiative.

Sell the whole C-suite.

It’s a good idea to include other C-suite execs and influencers in your touchpoint plans and outreach. And your messages to them must be unique to resonate with their pain points and business issues. And each will have very different needs and value propositions.

For example, take a CIO, you might pitch her via an ongoing drip campaign and some thought leadership content about a new technology platform for the entire enterprise. She gets the idea and concept, sees the value in your offering, and it’s something she’s been thinking about since the last tech team planning meeting.

That said, she has other concerns and won’t decide until she hears from the whole team. They each have special interests. The network admin is most concerned about how your new platform will sit on his network. Will it help, interfere and integrate with his network? That’s what he wants to hear about. Meanwhile, the VP head of sales wants to know how it will help his sales team’s process and CRM, and is also concerned about a seamless launch that won’t disrupt his customer sales cycle and revenue stream. And so it goes throughout every key voice in the C-level ecosystem. It’s not a one thing done well, but multiple conversations, tracks, and threads.

We’ve pulled some of the best thinking and our collective knowledge around reaching the C-suite together in our new eBook. Check out our free download What Makes the C-suite TickAnd learn more about how to create profitable conversations with high-profile decision-makers.

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *