Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.Recruiting the hard-to-recruit: physicians, physician assistants, new nurse practitioners, and RNs.

Sourcing and hiring  physicians and other healthcare professionals isn’t easy. In fact, for a lot of reasons they are among the toughest and hardest recruitment target audiences out there. Some of the “reasons why” are simple: every hospital, clinical practice, and provider organization is competing for the same finite pool of qualified  healthcare professionals. Physicians and healthcare professionals are an aging population—so the recruitment pool is shrinking just at the time when the need for more healthcare professionals of every variety is peaking.

According to census data and the National Technical Assistance and Research Center, 33 percent of the total U.S. workforce will be 50 years or older by 2016. You’re probably asking why that matters? Well . . . it’s because the healthcare industry already employs an older workforce than most other industries. And right now nearly half of all doctors are already over the age of 50. That said, it’s important for healthcare organizations to take strategic action—early—when recruiting physicians emerging from training.

So what are new physicians looking for? More than money.

The 2014 Residents and Fellows Survey, a questionnaire deployed to 15,401 residents and fellows from 2013 to collect and quantify practice and compensation expectations, provides great insights on how to help your healthcare organization ensure recruiting success, especially with residents in 2014 and beyond. A few include:

Screening for motivation

New physicians seek work-life balance, and their practice choices will be heavily influenced by family needs. As residents and healthcare professionals, proximity to family and family interests will be a factor in determining where new physicians decide to work—so it’s always good to highlight what your community and region have to offer along with benefits specific to the organization.

Using technology to your advantage

This seems like a no-brainer. Using traditional advertising to promote job opportunities is no longer the best tactic to reach these increasingly tech-savvy healthcare professionals. Residents,  fellows, new physicians, and early career changers  now consult their e-mail inboxes and online job boards when looking for their first or early practice.

It’s best to make sure your job posts and e-mails are optimized to appeal to young new physicians. Also, if your organization uses advanced technology such as robotics, telemedicine, and EHRs—call that out!  New physicians have been trained to use these technologies.

Offering lifestyle benefits

Newly trained physicians who are ready to settle down, buy a house, and start a family will look for a compensation package with benefits and incentives that enable them to meet these goals. New physicians look for two-year compensation guarantee, a signing bonus, flexible schedules, and opportunities to continue career growth.

Understanding the job search behaviors and decision-making factors of early-career healthcare professionals is essential to developing and implementing a strategy for recruitment.

I’m interested in learning more about different strategies and tactics your organization is doing—drop a note!

 

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Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.Recruiting the hard-to-recruit: physicians, physician assistants, new nurse practitioners, and RNs.

Sourcing and hiring  physicians and other healthcare professionals isn’t easy. In fact, for a lot of reasons they are among the toughest and hardest recruitment target audiences out there. Some of the “reasons why” are simple: every hospital, clinical practice, and provider organization is competing for the same finite pool of qualified  healthcare professionals. Physicians and healthcare professionals are an aging population—so the recruitment pool is shrinking just at the time when the need for more healthcare professionals of every variety is peaking.

According to census data and the National Technical Assistance and Research Center, 33 percent of the total U.S. workforce will be 50 years or older by 2016. You’re probably asking why that matters? Well . . . it’s because the healthcare industry already employs an older workforce than most other industries. And right now nearly half of all doctors are already over the age of 50. That said, it’s important for healthcare organizations to take strategic action—early—when recruiting physicians emerging from training.

So what are new physicians looking for? More than money.

The 2014 Residents and Fellows Survey, a questionnaire deployed to 15,401 residents and fellows from 2013 to collect and quantify practice and compensation expectations, provides great insights on how to help your healthcare organization ensure recruiting success, especially with residents in 2014 and beyond. A few include:

Screening for motivation

New physicians seek work-life balance, and their practice choices will be heavily influenced by family needs. As residents and healthcare professionals, proximity to family and family interests will be a factor in determining where new physicians decide to work—so it’s always good to highlight what your community and region have to offer along with benefits specific to the organization.

Using technology to your advantage

This seems like a no-brainer. Using traditional advertising to promote job opportunities is no longer the best tactic to reach these increasingly tech-savvy healthcare professionals. Residents,  fellows, new physicians, and early career changers  now consult their e-mail inboxes and online job boards when looking for their first or early practice.

It’s best to make sure your job posts and e-mails are optimized to appeal to young new physicians. Also, if your organization uses advanced technology such as robotics, telemedicine, and EHRs—call that out!  New physicians have been trained to use these technologies.

Offering lifestyle benefits

Newly trained physicians who are ready to settle down, buy a house, and start a family will look for a compensation package with benefits and incentives that enable them to meet these goals. New physicians look for two-year compensation guarantee, a signing bonus, flexible schedules, and opportunities to continue career growth.

Understanding the job search behaviors and decision-making factors of early-career healthcare professionals is essential to developing and implementing a strategy for recruitment.

I’m interested in learning more about different strategies and tactics your organization is doing—drop a note!

 

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There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

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Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.Recruiting the hard-to-recruit: physicians, physician assistants, new nurse practitioners, and RNs.

Sourcing and hiring  physicians and other healthcare professionals isn’t easy. In fact, for a lot of reasons they are among the toughest and hardest recruitment target audiences out there. Some of the “reasons why” are simple: every hospital, clinical practice, and provider organization is competing for the same finite pool of qualified  healthcare professionals. Physicians and healthcare professionals are an aging population—so the recruitment pool is shrinking just at the time when the need for more healthcare professionals of every variety is peaking.

According to census data and the National Technical Assistance and Research Center, 33 percent of the total U.S. workforce will be 50 years or older by 2016. You’re probably asking why that matters? Well . . . it’s because the healthcare industry already employs an older workforce than most other industries. And right now nearly half of all doctors are already over the age of 50. That said, it’s important for healthcare organizations to take strategic action—early—when recruiting physicians emerging from training.

So what are new physicians looking for? More than money.

The 2014 Residents and Fellows Survey, a questionnaire deployed to 15,401 residents and fellows from 2013 to collect and quantify practice and compensation expectations, provides great insights on how to help your healthcare organization ensure recruiting success, especially with residents in 2014 and beyond. A few include:

Screening for motivation

New physicians seek work-life balance, and their practice choices will be heavily influenced by family needs. As residents and healthcare professionals, proximity to family and family interests will be a factor in determining where new physicians decide to work—so it’s always good to highlight what your community and region have to offer along with benefits specific to the organization.

Using technology to your advantage

This seems like a no-brainer. Using traditional advertising to promote job opportunities is no longer the best tactic to reach these increasingly tech-savvy healthcare professionals. Residents,  fellows, new physicians, and early career changers  now consult their e-mail inboxes and online job boards when looking for their first or early practice.

It’s best to make sure your job posts and e-mails are optimized to appeal to young new physicians. Also, if your organization uses advanced technology such as robotics, telemedicine, and EHRs—call that out!  New physicians have been trained to use these technologies.

Offering lifestyle benefits

Newly trained physicians who are ready to settle down, buy a house, and start a family will look for a compensation package with benefits and incentives that enable them to meet these goals. New physicians look for two-year compensation guarantee, a signing bonus, flexible schedules, and opportunities to continue career growth.

Understanding the job search behaviors and decision-making factors of early-career healthcare professionals is essential to developing and implementing a strategy for recruitment.

I’m interested in learning more about different strategies and tactics your organization is doing—drop a note!

 

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How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.Recruiting the hard-to-recruit: physicians, physician assistants, new nurse practitioners, and RNs.

Sourcing and hiring  physicians and other healthcare professionals isn’t easy. In fact, for a lot of reasons they are among the toughest and hardest recruitment target audiences out there. Some of the “reasons why” are simple: every hospital, clinical practice, and provider organization is competing for the same finite pool of qualified  healthcare professionals. Physicians and healthcare professionals are an aging population—so the recruitment pool is shrinking just at the time when the need for more healthcare professionals of every variety is peaking.

According to census data and the National Technical Assistance and Research Center, 33 percent of the total U.S. workforce will be 50 years or older by 2016. You’re probably asking why that matters? Well . . . it’s because the healthcare industry already employs an older workforce than most other industries. And right now nearly half of all doctors are already over the age of 50. That said, it’s important for healthcare organizations to take strategic action—early—when recruiting physicians emerging from training.

So what are new physicians looking for? More than money.

The 2014 Residents and Fellows Survey, a questionnaire deployed to 15,401 residents and fellows from 2013 to collect and quantify practice and compensation expectations, provides great insights on how to help your healthcare organization ensure recruiting success, especially with residents in 2014 and beyond. A few include:

Screening for motivation

New physicians seek work-life balance, and their practice choices will be heavily influenced by family needs. As residents and healthcare professionals, proximity to family and family interests will be a factor in determining where new physicians decide to work—so it’s always good to highlight what your community and region have to offer along with benefits specific to the organization.

Using technology to your advantage

This seems like a no-brainer. Using traditional advertising to promote job opportunities is no longer the best tactic to reach these increasingly tech-savvy healthcare professionals. Residents,  fellows, new physicians, and early career changers  now consult their e-mail inboxes and online job boards when looking for their first or early practice.

It’s best to make sure your job posts and e-mails are optimized to appeal to young new physicians. Also, if your organization uses advanced technology such as robotics, telemedicine, and EHRs—call that out!  New physicians have been trained to use these technologies.

Offering lifestyle benefits

Newly trained physicians who are ready to settle down, buy a house, and start a family will look for a compensation package with benefits and incentives that enable them to meet these goals. New physicians look for two-year compensation guarantee, a signing bonus, flexible schedules, and opportunities to continue career growth.

Understanding the job search behaviors and decision-making factors of early-career healthcare professionals is essential to developing and implementing a strategy for recruitment.

I’m interested in learning more about different strategies and tactics your organization is doing—drop a note!

 

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How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.Recruiting the hard-to-recruit: physicians, physician assistants, new nurse practitioners, and RNs.

Sourcing and hiring  physicians and other healthcare professionals isn’t easy. In fact, for a lot of reasons they are among the toughest and hardest recruitment target audiences out there. Some of the “reasons why” are simple: every hospital, clinical practice, and provider organization is competing for the same finite pool of qualified  healthcare professionals. Physicians and healthcare professionals are an aging population—so the recruitment pool is shrinking just at the time when the need for more healthcare professionals of every variety is peaking.

According to census data and the National Technical Assistance and Research Center, 33 percent of the total U.S. workforce will be 50 years or older by 2016. You’re probably asking why that matters? Well . . . it’s because the healthcare industry already employs an older workforce than most other industries. And right now nearly half of all doctors are already over the age of 50. That said, it’s important for healthcare organizations to take strategic action—early—when recruiting physicians emerging from training.

So what are new physicians looking for? More than money.

The 2014 Residents and Fellows Survey, a questionnaire deployed to 15,401 residents and fellows from 2013 to collect and quantify practice and compensation expectations, provides great insights on how to help your healthcare organization ensure recruiting success, especially with residents in 2014 and beyond. A few include:

Screening for motivation

New physicians seek work-life balance, and their practice choices will be heavily influenced by family needs. As residents and healthcare professionals, proximity to family and family interests will be a factor in determining where new physicians decide to work—so it’s always good to highlight what your community and region have to offer along with benefits specific to the organization.

Using technology to your advantage

This seems like a no-brainer. Using traditional advertising to promote job opportunities is no longer the best tactic to reach these increasingly tech-savvy healthcare professionals. Residents,  fellows, new physicians, and early career changers  now consult their e-mail inboxes and online job boards when looking for their first or early practice.

It’s best to make sure your job posts and e-mails are optimized to appeal to young new physicians. Also, if your organization uses advanced technology such as robotics, telemedicine, and EHRs—call that out!  New physicians have been trained to use these technologies.

Offering lifestyle benefits

Newly trained physicians who are ready to settle down, buy a house, and start a family will look for a compensation package with benefits and incentives that enable them to meet these goals. New physicians look for two-year compensation guarantee, a signing bonus, flexible schedules, and opportunities to continue career growth.

Understanding the job search behaviors and decision-making factors of early-career healthcare professionals is essential to developing and implementing a strategy for recruitment.

I’m interested in learning more about different strategies and tactics your organization is doing—drop a note!

 

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How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.Recruiting the hard-to-recruit: physicians, physician assistants, new nurse practitioners, and RNs.

Sourcing and hiring  physicians and other healthcare professionals isn’t easy. In fact, for a lot of reasons they are among the toughest and hardest recruitment target audiences out there. Some of the “reasons why” are simple: every hospital, clinical practice, and provider organization is competing for the same finite pool of qualified  healthcare professionals. Physicians and healthcare professionals are an aging population—so the recruitment pool is shrinking just at the time when the need for more healthcare professionals of every variety is peaking.

According to census data and the National Technical Assistance and Research Center, 33 percent of the total U.S. workforce will be 50 years or older by 2016. You’re probably asking why that matters? Well . . . it’s because the healthcare industry already employs an older workforce than most other industries. And right now nearly half of all doctors are already over the age of 50. That said, it’s important for healthcare organizations to take strategic action—early—when recruiting physicians emerging from training.

So what are new physicians looking for? More than money.

The 2014 Residents and Fellows Survey, a questionnaire deployed to 15,401 residents and fellows from 2013 to collect and quantify practice and compensation expectations, provides great insights on how to help your healthcare organization ensure recruiting success, especially with residents in 2014 and beyond. A few include:

Screening for motivation

New physicians seek work-life balance, and their practice choices will be heavily influenced by family needs. As residents and healthcare professionals, proximity to family and family interests will be a factor in determining where new physicians decide to work—so it’s always good to highlight what your community and region have to offer along with benefits specific to the organization.

Using technology to your advantage

This seems like a no-brainer. Using traditional advertising to promote job opportunities is no longer the best tactic to reach these increasingly tech-savvy healthcare professionals. Residents,  fellows, new physicians, and early career changers  now consult their e-mail inboxes and online job boards when looking for their first or early practice.

It’s best to make sure your job posts and e-mails are optimized to appeal to young new physicians. Also, if your organization uses advanced technology such as robotics, telemedicine, and EHRs—call that out!  New physicians have been trained to use these technologies.

Offering lifestyle benefits

Newly trained physicians who are ready to settle down, buy a house, and start a family will look for a compensation package with benefits and incentives that enable them to meet these goals. New physicians look for two-year compensation guarantee, a signing bonus, flexible schedules, and opportunities to continue career growth.

Understanding the job search behaviors and decision-making factors of early-career healthcare professionals is essential to developing and implementing a strategy for recruitment.

I’m interested in learning more about different strategies and tactics your organization is doing—drop a note!

 

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How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.

Healthcare Professionals: Three Tips on Recruiting the Best.Recruiting the hard-to-recruit: physicians, physician assistants, new nurse practitioners, and RNs.

Sourcing and hiring  physicians and other healthcare professionals isn’t easy. In fact, for a lot of reasons they are among the toughest and hardest recruitment target audiences out there. Some of the “reasons why” are simple: every hospital, clinical practice, and provider organization is competing for the same finite pool of qualified  healthcare professionals. Physicians and healthcare professionals are an aging population—so the recruitment pool is shrinking just at the time when the need for more healthcare professionals of every variety is peaking.

According to census data and the National Technical Assistance and Research Center, 33 percent of the total U.S. workforce will be 50 years or older by 2016. You’re probably asking why that matters? Well . . . it’s because the healthcare industry already employs an older workforce than most other industries. And right now nearly half of all doctors are already over the age of 50. That said, it’s important for healthcare organizations to take strategic action—early—when recruiting physicians emerging from training.

So what are new physicians looking for? More than money.

The 2014 Residents and Fellows Survey, a questionnaire deployed to 15,401 residents and fellows from 2013 to collect and quantify practice and compensation expectations, provides great insights on how to help your healthcare organization ensure recruiting success, especially with residents in 2014 and beyond. A few include:

Screening for motivation

New physicians seek work-life balance, and their practice choices will be heavily influenced by family needs. As residents and healthcare professionals, proximity to family and family interests will be a factor in determining where new physicians decide to work—so it’s always good to highlight what your community and region have to offer along with benefits specific to the organization.

Using technology to your advantage

This seems like a no-brainer. Using traditional advertising to promote job opportunities is no longer the best tactic to reach these increasingly tech-savvy healthcare professionals. Residents,  fellows, new physicians, and early career changers  now consult their e-mail inboxes and online job boards when looking for their first or early practice.

It’s best to make sure your job posts and e-mails are optimized to appeal to young new physicians. Also, if your organization uses advanced technology such as robotics, telemedicine, and EHRs—call that out!  New physicians have been trained to use these technologies.

Offering lifestyle benefits

Newly trained physicians who are ready to settle down, buy a house, and start a family will look for a compensation package with benefits and incentives that enable them to meet these goals. New physicians look for two-year compensation guarantee, a signing bonus, flexible schedules, and opportunities to continue career growth.

Understanding the job search behaviors and decision-making factors of early-career healthcare professionals is essential to developing and implementing a strategy for recruitment.

I’m interested in learning more about different strategies and tactics your organization is doing—drop a note!

 

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