Social selling: Turning your employees into brand advocates

I don’t need to tell you that social media is an integral part of any business’s success, no matter what industry you’re in. Whether you’re an industrial engineer, a financial advisor, or a healthcare worker, your customers, clients, and patients are online and these online platforms are a key part of the Buyer’s Journey. The Buyer’s Journey is a multi-tier process that stems from the customer’s initial interest stage of your product or service to the final purchasing stage. You want to catch your customers at each of these stages.

pic 1

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

The first step is to educate your staff and update your website with the information your customers will need. What many businesses don’t realize is your presence on social media can be just as important as your website presence. According to the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report, more than half of buyers in industries like manufacturing, financial services, and healthcare turn to social media during this research process. When asked what role social media played in their research process, an overwhelming 73 percent said they “browsed existing discussions to learn more about the topic” and 53 percent “connected directly with potential vendors.”

pic 2 more than half of buyers

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

Customers want to see that your organization and your staff know their stuff, especially as they start to narrow down their search among a few organizations.

Social selling programs can help you reach your customers where you know they are. Whether you’re sharing trusted information about your product or service, or sharing industry trends and thought leadership articles, this is the information that will show customers you’re the organization of choice. These programs can be used for your organization’s social profiles, or shared with employees and sales reps to help them connect with customers on social media. By having an integrated social selling program, you can oversee the type of content your organization and your employees are sharing and adjust this content as your program progresses. Getting your employees involved in these programs will help them develop as thought leaders, while giving them an easy way to be an advocate for your organization.

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

While social selling will work in building your brand, connecting with customers and being there during the Buyer’s Journey, it has to be bolstered by passionate employees, a comprehensive and easy-to-use website, search engine optimization and more. As with all of your company initiatives, your social selling program needs goals and steps on how you’ll achieve them. Do you want more clients walking through the door? Do you need more sales leads for your new product launch? Whatever the outcome, make sure you have the tools to analyze what’s working and adjust the program accordingly. And of course, giving your employees a platform and the tools to show their expertise won’t automatically make them a good company spokesperson. Make sure you’ve given them the right social media training before letting them loose online.

How do you use social media to advocate for your organization?

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social selling: Turning your employees into brand advocates

I don’t need to tell you that social media is an integral part of any business’s success, no matter what industry you’re in. Whether you’re an industrial engineer, a financial advisor, or a healthcare worker, your customers, clients, and patients are online and these online platforms are a key part of the Buyer’s Journey. The Buyer’s Journey is a multi-tier process that stems from the customer’s initial interest stage of your product or service to the final purchasing stage. You want to catch your customers at each of these stages.

pic 1

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

The first step is to educate your staff and update your website with the information your customers will need. What many businesses don’t realize is your presence on social media can be just as important as your website presence. According to the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report, more than half of buyers in industries like manufacturing, financial services, and healthcare turn to social media during this research process. When asked what role social media played in their research process, an overwhelming 73 percent said they “browsed existing discussions to learn more about the topic” and 53 percent “connected directly with potential vendors.”

pic 2 more than half of buyers

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

Customers want to see that your organization and your staff know their stuff, especially as they start to narrow down their search among a few organizations.

Social selling programs can help you reach your customers where you know they are. Whether you’re sharing trusted information about your product or service, or sharing industry trends and thought leadership articles, this is the information that will show customers you’re the organization of choice. These programs can be used for your organization’s social profiles, or shared with employees and sales reps to help them connect with customers on social media. By having an integrated social selling program, you can oversee the type of content your organization and your employees are sharing and adjust this content as your program progresses. Getting your employees involved in these programs will help them develop as thought leaders, while giving them an easy way to be an advocate for your organization.

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

While social selling will work in building your brand, connecting with customers and being there during the Buyer’s Journey, it has to be bolstered by passionate employees, a comprehensive and easy-to-use website, search engine optimization and more. As with all of your company initiatives, your social selling program needs goals and steps on how you’ll achieve them. Do you want more clients walking through the door? Do you need more sales leads for your new product launch? Whatever the outcome, make sure you have the tools to analyze what’s working and adjust the program accordingly. And of course, giving your employees a platform and the tools to show their expertise won’t automatically make them a good company spokesperson. Make sure you’ve given them the right social media training before letting them loose online.

How do you use social media to advocate for your organization?

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social selling: Turning your employees into brand advocates

I don’t need to tell you that social media is an integral part of any business’s success, no matter what industry you’re in. Whether you’re an industrial engineer, a financial advisor, or a healthcare worker, your customers, clients, and patients are online and these online platforms are a key part of the Buyer’s Journey. The Buyer’s Journey is a multi-tier process that stems from the customer’s initial interest stage of your product or service to the final purchasing stage. You want to catch your customers at each of these stages.

pic 1

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

The first step is to educate your staff and update your website with the information your customers will need. What many businesses don’t realize is your presence on social media can be just as important as your website presence. According to the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report, more than half of buyers in industries like manufacturing, financial services, and healthcare turn to social media during this research process. When asked what role social media played in their research process, an overwhelming 73 percent said they “browsed existing discussions to learn more about the topic” and 53 percent “connected directly with potential vendors.”

pic 2 more than half of buyers

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

Customers want to see that your organization and your staff know their stuff, especially as they start to narrow down their search among a few organizations.

Social selling programs can help you reach your customers where you know they are. Whether you’re sharing trusted information about your product or service, or sharing industry trends and thought leadership articles, this is the information that will show customers you’re the organization of choice. These programs can be used for your organization’s social profiles, or shared with employees and sales reps to help them connect with customers on social media. By having an integrated social selling program, you can oversee the type of content your organization and your employees are sharing and adjust this content as your program progresses. Getting your employees involved in these programs will help them develop as thought leaders, while giving them an easy way to be an advocate for your organization.

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

Image taken from the 2015 B2B Buyer’s Survey Report.

While social selling will work in building your brand, connecting with customers and being there during the Buyer’s Journey, it has to be bolstered by passionate employees, a comprehensive and easy-to-use website, search engine optimization and more. As with all of your company initiatives, your social selling program needs goals and steps on how you’ll achieve them. Do you want more clients walking through the door? Do you need more sales leads for your new product launch? Whatever the outcome, make sure you have the tools to analyze what’s working and adjust the program accordingly. And of course, giving your employees a platform and the tools to show their expertise won’t automatically make them a good company spokesperson. Make sure you’ve given them the right social media training before letting them loose online.

How do you use social media to advocate for your organization?

How can we help you make change?

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *